62 QWERTY Android phones: amazing buttons!

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Are you looking for an Android phone with a physical QWERTY keypad? In my review you can find almost all qwerty-keyboard devices under different Android versions control. Some of them are sexy, some of them -- funny, some of them -- inspiring, but all of them are unique and unrepeatable.

Although physical keyboard phones might not be mainstream anymore, sometimes it’s hard to beat the feel of real keys under your fingertips. Blackberry may still be the default choice for many, but Android has a few of its own gems too. Sadly there are few great QWERTY Android handsets released very often, but here’s a collection of the best handsets, old and new.

Well, take some cookies and a cup of tea and prepare yourself for interesting journey to qwerty-keyboard android phones land!

Acer beTouch E210

It only takes a brief glance to realise that the E210's design is heavily indebted to that of the BlackBerry. This isn't the first time the Taiwanese manufacturer has attempted to fuse Android with a Qwerty keyboard either -- last year's beTouch E130 performed the same trick.

The E210's Qwerty keyboard is the best part of the phone, featuring lovely, raised buttons. Typing on the E210 is an enjoyable experience, with the raised buttons proving easy to hit when you're tapping at speed. They emit a quiet click when pressed, which means you can bash out a missive on the train without making other passengers want to punch you in the face. The E210 has a lightweight and surprisingly thin frame. At 110g, it's unlikely to cause your pocket to rupture, but it does feel rather cheap when compared to heavier phones.

The phone uses a crushingly disappointing resistive touchscreen. Using pressure-sensitive technology, this type of display isn't anywhere near as responsive as the capacitive versions seen on handsets like the iPhone 4 and Samsung Galaxy S II . It's even outmatched by the screens on cheaper phones, such as the Orange San Francisco. The landscape screen format causes problems when you encounter apps designed to function in portrait mode.

Because resistive technology can't handle more than one point of pressure at a time, the E210 doesn't support multi-touch gestures, such as pinch to zoom. This means you won't be able to quickly scale Google Maps using your thumb and forefinger, and some Android games, such as the brilliant PewPew, are rendered unplayable.

Acer beTouch E210Acer beTouch E210 specifications
Dimensions
116 x 63 x 12 mm (4.57 x 2.48 x 0.47 in)
Weight
109 g (3.84 oz)
SIM
Mini-SIM
Display type
Type TFT resistive touchscreen, 256K colors
Display size
Size 2.6 inches (~28.6% screen-to-body ratio)
Display resolution
Resolution 320 x 240 pixels (~154 ppi pixel density)
OS
Android OS, v2.2 (Froyo)
Chipset
Qualcomm MSM7227 Snapdragon
CPU
600 MHz ARM 11
GPU
Adreno 200
Internal memory
256 MB RAM, 512 MB ROM
Camera
3.15 MP, 2048 x 1536 pixels
Battery
Li-Ion 1300 mAh battery
Acer beTouch E130

The Acer beTouch E130's budget price is more evident elsewhere. Acer has preinstalled the outdated 'Donut' 1.6 version of Google's mobile platform, which lacks Microsoft Exchange and Flash support and won't let you add multiple email addresses.

The Acer beTouch E130 RoadSync app does let you synchronise corporate email, calendar, contacts and tasks using Microsoft Exchange ActiveSync. But applications developed for newer versions of the operating system won't be compatible, and no updates were available when we checked.
An underpowered 416MHz processor powers the Acer beTouch E130, while a low-res 320x240-pixel (QVGA) screen and a 3Mp camera (without flash) captures grainy images even in well-lit conditions. You'll also need to install a microSD card (hot-swappable) before it will work.

There's no front-facing camera on the Acer beTouch E130 for making video calls, and we found the supplied earphones no better than those usually thrown in with mobile phones. Even after we calibrated the panel of the Acer beTouch E130 for our fingers, we struggled to select icons at the extreme edges and often reverted to using the trackball. As a resistive rather than capacitive screen, there's no scope for multi-touch gestures here either. We also found that several games we downloaded from the Android Market demanded a portrait display, thus making some icons even smaller, despite us having turned off the accelerometer.

Thankfully, most tasks can be carried out without using the touchscreen at all. With moderate use and background data, Wi-Fi and Bluetooth disabled, we found the Acer beTouch E130's 5.55Wh battery could stretch to around two days. Our review model of the Acer beTouch E130 was buggy, with freeze-ups occuring more often than should be reasonably expected and the touchscreen frequently becoming unresponsive.

Acer beTouch E130 specifications:
Dimensions
115 x 62.5 x 11.5 mm (4.53 x 2.46 x 0.45 in)
Weight
109 g (3.84 oz)
SIM
Mini-SIM
Display type
TFT touchscreen, 65K colors
Display size
2.6 inches (~29.1% screen-to-body ratio)
Display resolution
320 x 240 pixels (~154 ppi pixel density)
OS
Android OS, v1.6 (Donut)
Chipset
ST Ericsson PNX6715
CPU
416 MHz
GPU
----
Internal memory
256 MB RAM, 512 MB ROM
Camera
3.15 MP, 2048 x 1536 pixels
Battery
Li-Ion 1500 mAh battery
Alcatel OT-916

Alcatel's phones tend to be a bit of a mixed bag when it comes to design and build quality. However, the 916 is definitely one of the company's better looking and better built offerings. When you pick it up it feels very solid in the hand and if you apply pressure or twisting force to the chassis it doesn't flex or creek like a lot of budget phones. It feels comfortable to hold too, thanks in no small part to the curved battery cover that's finished with a slightly rubberised coating. There's some nice detailing too, such as the metallic band on the back that frames the camera lens and rear mounted speaker grill.

From the front the 916 looks very much like a traditional Blackberry handset with a landscape screen at the top, an optical joystick in the middle and a full Qwerty keyboard beneath. Naturally, as this is an Android phone there's also a line of four touch buttons directly beneath the screen for the usual menu, home, search and back functions. The front styling is rather attractive too, thanks to its glossy black and gun metal grey colour scheme.

Alcatel has sensibly placed both the power/lock switch and standard 3.5mm headphone jack at the top and you'll find the volume rocker switch on the right hand edge. Flip the phone over to the other edge and you'll find a dedicated camera button -- something that's pretty rare on Android handsets, so it's a welcome addition here.

Alcatel OT-916 specifications:
Dimensions
117 x 64.8 x 11.6 mm (4.61 x 2.55 x 0.46 in)
Weight
126 g (4.44 oz)
SIM
Mini-SIM
Display type
TFT capacitive touchscreen, 256K colors
Display size
2.6 inches (~27.6% screen-to-body ratio)
Display resolution
----
OS
Android OS, v2.3 (Gingerbread)
Chipset
Mediatek MT6573
CPU
650 MHz Cortex-A9
GPU
PowerVR SGX531
Internal memory
150 MB
Camera
3.15 MP, 2048 x 1536 pixels, LED flash
Battery
Li-Ion 1500 mAh battery
Alcatel OT-910

The Alcatel One Touch 910 is a very compact looking phone with a excellent look to it. It feels expensive and does not at once feel cheap. What is incredible about this phone is that it is both a qwerty keypad and a touch screen mobile phone. The phone runs the Android operating system, which means that download applications is the easiest thing ever, all you need is a Google account and you have access to thousands and thousands of free apps. The phone's touch screen is smooth, but its not the best. The buttons are quite small and it is quite hard sometimes to text. But overall you would say that this is a very nicely made mobile phone and is deserving of the price put on it.

Alcatel OT-910 specifications:
Dimensions
119 x 58 x 12.4 mm (4.69 x 2.28 x 0.49 in)
Weight
120 g
SIM
Mini-SIM
Display type
TFT capacitive touchscreen, 256K colors
Display size
2.6 inches
Display resolution
320 x 240 pixels (~154 ppi pixel density)
OS
Android OS, v2.3 (Gingerbread)
Chipset
----
CPU
Qualcomm Snapdragon S1 MSM7227 600 MHz
GPU
Adreno 200
Internal memory
150 MB
Camera
5 MP, 2592 х 1944 pixels, autofocus, LED flash
Battery
Li-Ion 1300 mAh battery
Alcatel OT-980

Getting Android 2.1 to the market for under £100 is an achievement in itself, so coming down hard on the failings of the Alcatel OT-980 doesn't really seem very sporting. When compared to other phones in the same price range, the OT-980 is undeniably impressive. It's wise to remember that handsets like the HTC Desire and even its cheaper cousin, the HTC Wildfire, are considerably more expensive than Alcatel's effort. Place the OT-980 alongside feature phones like the Sony Ericsson Cedar or LG Town C300 , and it becomes a more appealing proposition.

On the flip side, the OT-980 fares less well when placed alongside its budget Android rivals, such as the Orange San Francisco and Huawei Ideos - both of which include capacitive touchscreens for the same sub-£100 price of Alcatel's contender.

Alcatel OT-980 specifications:
Dimensions
108 x 60.4 x 15.9 mm (4.25 x 2.38 x 0.63 in)
Weight
152 g (5.36 oz)
SIM
Mini-SIM
Display type
TFT resistive touchscreen, 256K colors
Display size
2.8 inches (~37.2% screen-to-body ratio)
Display resolution
240 x 320 pixels (~143 ppi pixel density)
OS
Android OS, v2.1 (Eclair
Chipset
----
CPU
----
GPU
----
Internal memory
194 MB
Camera
2 MP, 1600 x 1200 pixels
Battery
Li-Ion 1150 mAh battery
Highscreen Zeus

Vobis Computer’s unveiled their first Android platform mobile phone back in July, well now according to an article over on unwired view, Vobis Computer’s has unveiled their 2nd Android handset, the Highscreen Zeus.

The Vobis Highscreen Zeus is a step up from the previous Highscreen PP5420 as it now packs a full slide out QWERTY keyboard while other specs include HSPA, 3.2 inch touch screen, 3 megapixel camera with auto-focus, GPS, Bluetooth 2.1 and 256MB RAM and 512MB ROM. The Vobis Highscreen Zeus handset measures 110 x 55 x 15.1mm with a weight of 124.6 grams and while the exact release date is not known it is expected to be released in Russia commanding a price tag of 13990 rubles which is roughly $483.

Highscreen Zeus specifications:
Dimensions
55 x 110 x 15.1 mm
Weight
125 g
SIM
Mini-SIM
Display type
TFT resistive touchscreen, 256K colors
Display size
3.2 inches
Display resolution
240 x 400 (146 ppi pixel density)
OS
Android 2.2
Chipset
CPU
Qualcomm MSM 7225
GPU
Internal memory
512 MB
Camera
3 MP
Battery
Li-Ion 1010 mAh battery
HTC ChaCha

Like its (bizarre choice of) name, the HTC ChaCha is no bore. Slim and well built, it feels like a quality device in the hand. It's not particularly light at 124g, but feels a lot heavier than the Incredible S for instance (despite being 13g lighter). The body is made of white plastic and brushed metal. The battery door is plastic, and if you plan on changing the battery or the SIM card often, you may find yourself uttering a few choice words.

But it does have a function here - as you hold the ChaCha to look at the screen, the keyboard is naturally tilted towards you. We can't work out if it's a nifty bit of designer genius or a coincidence but either way, the chin makes the phone bulge out if wearing tighter trousers, so beware!

The QWERTY keyboard is handy and pleasant to use with rubberised keys, since the ChaCha is a messaging device, but that dedicated Facebook button at the bottom of the phone which fires up a Facebook client is the main selling point.

HTC ChaCha specifications:
Dimensions
114.4 x 64.6 x 10.7 mm (4.50 x 2.54 x 0.42 in)
Weight
120 g (4.23 oz)
SIM
Mini-SIM
Display type
TFT capacitive touchscreen, 256K colors
Display size
2.6 inches (~27.2% screen-to-body ratio)
Display resolution
480 x 320 pixels (~222 ppi pixel density)
OS
Android OS, v2.3 (Gingerbread)
Chipset
----
CPU
Qualcomm Snapdragon S1 MSM7227T, 800 MHz
GPU
Adreno 200
Internal memory
512 MB
Camera
5 MP, 2592 x 1944 pixels
Battery
Li-Ion 1250 mAh battery
HTC EVO Shift 4G

The HTC Evo Shift 4G takes some style cues from its eye-catching, touch-only sibling, the HTC Evo 4G, but the Shift stands out on its own, as it combines high-quality look and feel. At 4.6 inches tall by 2.3 inches wide by 0.6 inch thick and 5.9 ounces, the slider smartphone is much more comfortable to hold than the larger and wider Evo. In addition, the soft-touch finish and aluminum accents give it a more premium feel than the Samsung Epic 4G, which felt a bit plasticky and slick.

Of course, for some, the main draw of the Evo Shift's design may be the physical keyboard, and we don't think it will disappoint. The four-row keyboard features rectangular buttons that are a good size and have a decent amount of spacing between them. The Epic 4G's keyboard still takes the cake for comfort and ease of use, but still, we had very few mispresses on the Evo Shift. The buttons also have a nonslippery texture, and though they're a bit flat, they provide nice, tactile feedback.

There is no dedicated number row; instead, they share space with the letter keys on the top row. You do get a D-pad on the lower right-hand side, but it's small enough that it doesn't interfere with the overall ergonomics of the keyboard. There are also several handy shortcuts on the bottom. We should note that the slider mechanism on the Evo Shift is quite strong. The screen locks securely into place, and unlike on the T-Mobile G2, the hinge feels sturdy enough to hold up over prolonged use.

HTC EVO Shift 4G specifications:
Dimensions
117 x 60 x 16 mm (4.61 x 2.36 x 0.63 in)
Weight
130 g (4.59 oz)
SIM
Mini-SIM
Display type
TFT capacitive touchscreen, 65K colors
Display size
3.6 inches (~52.5% screen-to-body ratio)
Display resolution
480 x 800 pixels (~259 ppi pixel density)
OS
Android OS, v2.3 (Gingerbread)
Chipset
Qualcomm MSM7630 Snapdragon
CPU
800 MHz Scorpion
GPU
Adreno 205
Internal memory
512 MB RAM / 2048 MB ROM
Camera
5 MP, 2592 x 1944 pixels
Battery
Li-Ion 1500 mAh battery
c

The QWERTY slider on the HTC Merge wasn't the easiest to use and we've experienced better keyboards. Call quality was sometimes disappointing on our roaming calls.

People had some difficulty with the sliding mechanism. In addition to feeling a bit stiff in our hands, the Merge's rounded corners and beveled designs often fell in all the wrong places for our fingers, and left us frequently fumbling to access the keyboard, at least until you got used to it. While not everyone you had try it experienced the same problems, enough people did that we recommend that prospective Merge owners try out the phone in a store before they buy.

The Merge's QWERTY keyboard area is small, spanning just over an inch, comparable to the T-Mobile G2. (The Samsung Epic 4G, in contrast, gives you 1.5 inches to work with.) The fully separated keys never felt too small to our smaller hands, but they did feel thin and flat. Although they bounced back just fine, the keys weren't as snappy or tactile as on other physical keyboards we've used, which slowed us down a bit.

Just above the keyboard are two lights that indicate when you've got the Caps and function keys turned on. On the right side of the keyboard is the AP1 button, a customizable convenience key. You can assign the AP1 a function from a list of options in the Settings menu, such as accessing an application or quickly composing a message. You can also trigger turn-by-turn navigation or calling your mom, but keep in mind you have to open the keyboard first before pressing the button.

c specifications:
Dimensions
120.7 x 61.9 x 13.8 mm (4.75 x 2.44 x 0.54 in)
Weight
198 g (6.98 oz)
SIM
Mini-SIM
Display type
S-LCD capacitive touchscreen, 16M colors
Display size
3.8 inches (~55.0% screen-to-body ratio)
Display resolution
480 x 800 pixels (~246 ppi pixel density)
OS
Android OS, v2.2 (Froyo)
Chipset
Qualcomm MSM7630
CPU
800 MHz
GPU
Adreno 205
Internal memory
2 GB, 512 MB RAM
Camera
5 MP, 2592 х 1944 pixels
Battery
Li-Ion 1400 mAh battery
HTC Desire Z

Open the keyboard and you see there's ingenuity on show as well. Instead of a slide mechanism it uses a double pivot device. This isn't totally new but what it has allowed HTC to do is add extra height to the keyboard, and as a result it sits closer to the level of the screen making it easier to type on than more recessed alternatives.

The only thing letting the side down on first glance is the presence of the optical trackpad that sits below the screen. While Android smartphones have a long tradition of having trackballs or D-pads (for when touchscreen navigation doesn't quite cut it), we've long had a suspicion that they're not really needed. This suspicion was confirmed when we looked at the HTC Desire HD, which does away with any such device and instead relies wholly on the touchscreen. As a by-product of this, more of the front can be given up to the screen and the four touch sensitive buttons that sit beneath it, while also giving the whole device a cleaner look. With that precedent set we were disappointed to see the trackpad on the Desire Z, despite it actually working very well.

The physical keyboard is also excellent. The layout is top notch with highlights including two 'Fn' buttons, so you can activate secondary functions without either thumb, and two easy to set-up shortcut buttons (those labelled 1 and 2 with the three dots on) giving you quick access to your favourite programs. The keys are nice and large with a decent action, though not quite as good as the best with there being a slight leaning towards feeling mushy. Nonetheless we found we were able to touch-type after only a short period of practice.

HTC Desire Z specifications:
Dimensions
119 x 60.4 x 14.2 mm (4.69 x 2.38 x 0.56 in)
Weight
180 g (6.35 oz)
SIM
Mini-SIM
Display type
S-LCD capacitive touchscreen, 16M colors
Display size
3.7 inches (~54.2% screen-to-body ratio)
Display resolution
480 x 800 pixels (~252 ppi pixel density)
OS
Android OS, v2.3 (Gingerbread)
Chipset
Qualcomm MSM7230
CPU
800 MHz Scorpion
GPU
Adreno 205
Internal memory
1.5 GB, 512 MB RAM
Camera
5 MP, 2592 х 1944 pixels
Battery
Li-Ion 1300 mAh battery
HTC Dream (T-Mobile G1)

G1 has solid construction and features a soft-touch finish on the back that provides a nice rubberlike texture, making it easy to grip the phone and comfortable to hold. Also, there's a good reason for G1's larger size: a full QWERTY keyboard. There are a number of users who are reluctant to switch to a full touch-screen smartphone because of the lack of a tactile keyboard, so the G1 is certainly an attractive option for such customers.

To access the keyboard, just push the screen to the right. The sliding mechanism is fairly interesting in that it's not a straight up-and-down motion; the screen actually swings out slightly to the left before snapping into place. We were indifferent to this design quirk; we didn't find any particular advantage or disadvantage, just something to note. The sliding motion was smooth, but after a few days of use, we started to notice a creaking sound whenever we nudged the screen--not good

The keyboard itself is a reminiscent of the T-Mobile Sidekick, as many observers pointed out during our review period. That's not necessarily a bad thing, since we like the Sidekick's keyboard. The buttons are a bit small, but overall the keyboard feels roomy and there's enough spacing between the keys that we think it shouldn't give too many users problems. If anything, we wish the buttons were raised a bit more, since right now, they're set flush with the phone's surface. The bigger issue is that the bottom section of the G1 makes it awkward to hold the phone when typing messages, since your right hand doesn't quite have the full range of motion. It definitely affected the speed and accuracy of typing.

With the release of the Android 1.5 update, the G1 now has an onscreen portrait and landscape keyboard, providing you with another way to enter text onto the smartphone. With a physical keyboard, some might wonder why a soft keyboard is even needed but it was annoying and inconvenient to have to slide open the phone every time you wanted to type anything, such as a simple search term or a URL address, so we're happy to see this added feature. In addition, the update supports the installation of third-party keyboards as well.

HTC Dream (T-Mobile G1) specifications:
Dimensions
117.7 x 55.7 x 17.1 mm (4.63 x 2.19 x 0.67 in)
Weight
158 g (5.57 oz)
SIM
Mini-SIM
Display type
TFT capacitive touchscreen, 65K colors
Display size
3.2 inches (~46.5% screen-to-body ratio)
Display resolution
320 x 480 pixels (~180 ppi pixel density)
OS
Android OS, v1.6 (Donut)
Chipset
Qualcomm MSM7201A
CPU
528 MHz ARM 11
GPU
Adreno 130
Internal memory
192 MB RAM, 256 MB ROM
Camera
3.15 MP, 2048 x 1536 pixels
Battery
Li-Ion 1150 mAh battery
Huawei U8300

The Huawei U8300 better known as the Ideos Chat phone presents itself as a cost-effective handset, providing a smartphone experience to users in a low budget. Going by the current scenario, the Android OS is probably the more desirable one among smartphone users and if there’s anything really holding back users, it seems to be their price.

On receiving Huawei Ideos Chat U8300, the very first feature noticed by us was the brick shaped QWERTY keypad, which instantly depicted the device to aid in the huge army of SMS senders and IM chatters, presumably more suitable for the younger generation. The handset design had a substantial resemblance to many early handheld gaming devices and the form factor wasn’t up to-mark for making a good first impression. Also, when held in hand, the device gave out a very delicate feel, the kind you mostly find in toys that can easily break. Moving on to the exterior of the device, basic function keys such as the power button can be found on the upper-part of the body while the volume control keys are located on its left. The 3.2 megapixel camera is positioned on the rear. A 3.5mm audio jack serves for audio output, the device features and a microUSB slot meets charging and data connectivity needs.

Huawei U8300 specifications:
Dimensions
94 x 64 x 11 mm (3.70 x 2.52 x 0.43 in)
Weight
104 g (3.67 oz)
SIM
Mini-SIM
Display type
TFT touchscreen, 256K colors
Display size
2.6 inches (~34.8% screen-to-body ratio)
Display resolution
320 x 240 pixels (~154 ppi pixel density)
OS
Android OS, v2.1 (Eclair)
Chipset
----
CPU
Qualcomm Snapdragon S1 MSM7225, 528 MGHz
GPU
----
Internal memory
256 MB RAM, 512 MB ROM
Camera
3.15 MP, 2048 x 1536 pixels, LED flash
Battery
Li-Ion 930 mAh battery
Motorola ADMIRAL

The Motorola Admiral measures 4.7 by 2.4 by 0.5 inches (HWD) and weighs 4.7 ounces. It's made of a mixture of glass and rubberized plastic, with a textured, soft touch back panel that makes the phone very comfortable to hold. The Admiral is designed to meet Military Standard 810G for dust, shock, vibration, solar radiation, low pressure, and high and low temperatures. It feels solid, and a lot tougher than your average smartphone, but I'm not sure it would survive a hard drop onto concrete; keep that in mind and make sure to get your hands on the phone before you decide it's right for your workplace.

There's a camera button on the right side of the phone, power and speakerphone controls on the top, and volume controls and a push-to-talk button on the left. The 3.1-inch touch screen is a little small, but looks ultra sharp and vibrant thanks to the 480-by-640-pixel resolution. There are four haptic feedback-enabled touch keys right below the display. The QWERTY keyboard is about the same size as what you'd find on a BlackBerry. The keys seem a little cramped, but they're angled for optimal separation and super clicky, so typing is a breeze.

Motorola ADMIRAL specifications:
Dimensions
119 x 62 x 12.2 mm (4.69 x 2.44 x 0.48 in)
Weight
134 g (4.73 oz)
SIM
Mini-SIM
Display type
TFT capacitive touchscreen, 16M colors
Display size
3.1 inches (~40.3% screen-to-body ratio)
Display resolution
480 x 640 pixels (~258 ppi pixel density)
OS
Android OS, v2.3.4 (Gingerbread)
Chipset
Qualcomm MSM8655 Snapdragon
CPU
1.2 GHz Scorpion
GPU
Adreno 205
Internal memory
4 GB ROM, 512 MB RAM
Camera
5 MP, 2592 х 1944 pixels
Battery
Li-Ion 1860 mAh battery
Motorola CLIQ 2

Though it shows a design evolution from the original Cliq, the Cliq 2 has a lot in common with that device. You'll notice the same basic shape, a slider keyboard, and a similar placement of external buttons and peripheral ports. Yet, Moto made changes where it counts. The rounded edges give the phone a slimmer feel, and the darker color around the display gives it a more professional look. At 4.56 inches long by 2.34 inches wide by 0.57 inch wide, the Cliq 2 is about halfway between the Cliq and Cliq XT in size, but it's heavier than either model (6.17 ounces). That's more bulk than we like in a cell phone, but the trade-off is a sturdy feel and a solid slider construction. We also like the textured soft-touch material on the back cover.

Below the display are four touch controls (menu, back, search, and home). They are rather small, but they're still responsive and easy to use. And, in any case, we wouldn't advocate shrinking the display just to get larger controls. On the home screen itself you'll find additional touch controls for accessing the dial pad, calling menu, main menu, and your phone book.

One of the Cliq 2's best features is its physical keyboard. Though the design may be arresting at first--some people see a spiderweb, whereas others see reptile scales--we loved almost everything about it. Not only are the individual keys quite large, but they're covered in a comfortable rubbery material. We were able to type quickly with few mistakes. What's more, the large space bar is located conveniently in the middle of the bottom row, and there's plenty of space at the top edge and on either side. Our only beef with the keyboard is that we'd prefer more shortcut and function buttons beyond the dedicated search control and the navigation arrows.

The Cliq 2 also offers the revamped Android virtual keyboard that came with Froyo. You can access it only when the phone is closed, but it has a spacious layout and the benefit of the Swype feature. Even with Swype, however, we usually stuck with the physical keys. The virtual dial pad is almost unchanged from other Android phones; expect large buttons and shortcuts to various calling features.

Motorola CLIQ 2 specifications:
Dimensions
116 x 59.6 x 14.5 mm (4.57 x 2.35 x 0.57 in)
Weight
175 g (6.17 oz)
SIM
Mini-SIM
Display type
TFT capacitive touchscreen, 256K colors
Display size
3.7 inches (~54.6% screen-to-body ratio)
Display resolution
480 x 854 pixels (~265 ppi pixel density)
OS
Android OS, v2.3 (Gingerbread)
Chipset
Begonia
CPU
1 GHz
GPU
PowerVR SGX530
Internal memory
1024 MB ROM, 512 MB RAM
Camera
5 MP, 2560 x 1920 pixels
Battery
Li-Ion 1420 mAh battery
Motorola DROID 3

Speaking of improvements, the keyboard is the area Motorola appeared to focus on the most. The Droid 2's board, while better than the original by a country mile, still left plenty of room for improvement. Interestingly, the current model steps up by splitting the difference between those two keyboards. For instance, the keys aren't as bouncy or rubbery, but they also aren't flat. It's actually the perfect balance of give and clickiness -- the keys feel natural to type on, and we didn't experience any learning curve, making it a decided improvement over the Droid 2. The sliding mechanism's a bit stiff, though usable; if given the choice we'd rather have it err on the side of solid as opposed to flimsy.

We also applaud HelloMoto for including a row of dedicated number keys. It's a major frustration for us when companies omit this from QWERTY keyboards, since it throws off our "typing groove" -- having to stop mid-sentence to hunt down the ALT or Fn keys and manually enter each number really breaks up the flow.

Motorola also seemed to learn its lesson from the debacle that was the original Droid's direction pad, as it was retooled for the second-gen devices and remains in tact this time around. The d-pad is much smaller and relegated to the lower right corner of the keyboard, which leaves enough room to make every individual key larger and easier to press.

The keys are also backlit, which makes it a great deal easier to text and email at night or in a darkened room. This is infinitely better than being forced to use the onscreen keyboard in order to see what we're writing. With that said, however, the virtual version of the 'board is still a breeze to use. On top of the default Moto keyboard, the Droid 3 comes with Swype pre-installed as an option. We understand that many people have love-hate relationships with Swype, and much of it depends on its accuracy; on this device, however, we felt it handled our need for typing speed well, with few incorrect guesses.

Motorola DROID 3 specifications:
Dimensions
124 x 64 x 13 mm (4.88 x 2.52 x 0.51 in)
Weight
167 g (5.89 oz)
SIM
Mini-SIM
Display type
TFT capacitive touchscreen, 16M colors
Display size
4.0 inches (~55.6% screen-to-body ratio)
Display resolution
540 x 960 pixels (~275 ppi pixel density)
OS
Android OS, v2.3 (Gingerbread)
Chipset
TI OMAP 4430
CPU
Dual-core 1GHz Cortex-A9
GPU
PowerVR SGX540
Internal memory
16 GB ROM, 512 MB RAM
Camera
8 MP, 3264 x 2448 pixels
Battery
Li-Ion 1540 mAh battery
Motorola FIRE (Motorola SPICE Key)

The Motorola Fire comes in a shiny black cover and has a silver coated rim running along the sides of the device. The design looks a little like the BlackBerry Curve series albeit with a bigger screen. The back and front of the phone is glossy and attracts a lot fingerprints and scratches. As far as the physical keyboard is concerned, there’s no spacing between each key and this might be problematic for people with big hands. However, a slight dent exists on each key to distinguish it from the other ones.

Motorola FIRE (Motorola SPICE Key) specifications:
Dimensions
116.5 x 58 x 13.5 mm (4.59 x 2.28 x 0.53 in)
Weight
110 g (3.88 oz)
SIM
Dual SIM (Mini-SIM, dual stand-by)
Display type
TFT capacitive touchscreen, 256K colors
Display size
2.8 inches (~35.9% screen-to-body ratio)
Display resolution
240 x 320 pixels (~143 ppi pixel density)
OS
Android OS, v2.3 (Gingerbread)
Chipset
CPU
Qualcomm Snapdragon S1 MSM7227, 600 MHz
GPU
Adreno 200
Internal memory
512 MB ROM, 256 MB RAM
Camera
3.15 MP, 2048 x 1536 pixels
Battery
Li-Ion 1400 mAh battery
Motorola Milestone 3

Speaking of improvements, the keyboard is the area Motorola appeared to focus on the most. The Droid 2's board, while better than the original by a country mile, still left plenty of room for improvement. Interestingly, the current model steps up by splitting the difference between those two keyboards. For instance, the keys aren't as bouncy or rubbery, but they also aren't flat. It's actually the perfect balance of give and clickiness -- the keys feel natural to type on, and we didn't experience any learning curve, making it a decided improvement over the Droid 2. The sliding mechanism's a bit stiff, though usable; if given the choice we'd rather have it err on the side of solid as opposed to flimsy.

We also applaud HelloMoto for including a row of dedicated number keys. It's a major frustration for us when companies omit this from QWERTY keyboards, since it throws off our "typing groove" -- having to stop mid-sentence to hunt down the ALT or Fn keys and manually enter each number really breaks up the flow.

Motorola also seemed to learn its lesson from the debacle that was the original Droid's direction pad, as it was retooled for the second-gen devices and remains in tact this time around. The d-pad is much smaller and relegated to the lower right corner of the keyboard, which leaves enough room to make every individual key larger and easier to press.

The keys are also backlit, which makes it a great deal easier to text and email at night or in a darkened room. This is infinitely better than being forced to use the onscreen keyboard in order to see what we're writing. With that said, however, the virtual version of the 'board is still a breeze to use. On top of the default Moto keyboard, the Droid 3 comes with Swype pre-installed as an option. We understand that many people have love-hate relationships with Swype, and much of it depends on its accuracy; on this device, however, we felt it handled our need for typing speed well, with few incorrect guesses.

Motorola Milestone 3 specifications:
Dimensions
123.3 x 64.1 x 12.9 mm (4.85 x 2.52 x 0.51 in)
Weight
184 g (6.49 oz)
SIM
Mini-SIM
Display type
TFT capacitive touchscreen, 16M colors
Display size
4.0 inches (~55.8% screen-to-body ratio)
Display resolution
540 x 960 pixels (~275 ppi pixel density)
OS
Android OS, v2.3.4 (Gingerbread)
Chipset
TI OMAP 4430
CPU
Dual-core 1 GHz Cortex-A9
GPU
PowerVR SGX540
Internal memory
8 GB ROM, 512 MB RAM
Camera
8 MP, 3264 x 2448 pixels
Battery
Li-Ion 1540 mAh battery
Motorola PRO+

Despite cramming in both a 3.1inch portrait touchscreen and full Qwerty keyboard, the Pro+s actually a pretty normal sized smartphone. Standing 120mm tall it's around the same height as the HTC Radar, but it's slightly thicker measuring 12mm deep. It's nicely styled, though, with a wavy ridged pattern etched into the rubberised battery cover and a piano black finish used on the bezel around the screen.

Despite the fact that the battery cover doesn’t fit as snugly against the battery as we would have liked (when you tap the cover it makes a slightly hollow sound), the phone feels quite solid overall, and the display is covered by tough Gorilla glass, which is important as this handset is likely to be used and abused by corporate types who spend a lot of their time on the road.

You can prise the battery cover open using a finger nail via a tab at the top and this reveals the Sim card slot, MicroSD slot and the removable battery. The microSD card slot is housed separately from the battery compartment, so you don’t have to remove the 1,550mAh battery to get at it

Apart from the keyboard, the physical buttons have been kept to a minimum. There's a power button at the top that also doubles up as a lock switch, while on the right hand side you'll find a volume rocker switch. The top of the handset also houses a standard 3.5mm headphone jack and on the left hand edge there's a micro USB port for charging and syncing duties.

Motorola PRO+ specifications:
Dimensions
119.5 x 62 x 11.7 mm (4.70 x 2.44 x 0.46 in)
Weight
113 g (3.99 oz)
SIM
Mini-SIM
Display type
TFT capacitive touchscreen, 16M colors
Display size
3.1 inches (~40.2% screen-to-body ratio)
Display resolution
640 x 480 pixels (~258 ppi pixel density)
OS
Android OS, v2.3 (Gingerbread)
Chipset
----
CPU
1 GHz
GPU
----
Internal memory
4 GB ROM, 512 MB RAM
Camera
5 MP, 2592 х 1944 pixels
Battery
Li-Ion 1600 mAh battery
Motorola SPICE

Out of the box, I was immediately impressed with the screen size and housing of this device. I was initially worried that the low cost of the Spice would be apparent in its design, however after handling the device and playing around with the sliding mechanism, I am happy to report that this is not the case. The Spice is encased with a hard, black plastic that seemed to resist scratches and fingerprints quite well. This device fits comfortably in the palm of your hand, and can easily be used with one hand.

The front of the Motorola Spice houses a 3” capacitive touchscreen with 240 x 320 QVGA. Below this screen are four capacitive shortcut buttons for Options, Home, Back, and Search. The left side of this device sports a microUSB port for charging/PC connectivity, while the right side of this device houses volume rockers. The top of the device houses a 3.5mm headphone jack, and a button for power/lock.

The back of the Spice houses a small speaker, a 3.2MP camera (8x digital zoom, fixed focus, video capture), and the newly designed “BackTrack”. This feature consists of a square touchpad (approx. 15mm by 15mm), which allows users to input touch screen commands/gestures (such as panning left/right, scrolling up/down, utilizing on-screen cursor), without having to use the touchscreen.

Once you slide open this device, you will reveal a full, QWERTY keyboard, which is composed of plastic keys that are slightly raised and curved. This keyboard is very comfortable and easy to type on, and a large improvement from Motorola’s earlier keyboard attempts on the Charm and Flipout.

Motorola SPICE specifications:
Dimensions
97 x 61 x 16.8 mm, 87.5 cc (3.82 x 2.40 x 0.66 in)
Weight
145 g (5.11 oz)
SIM
Mini-SIM
Display type
TFT capacitive touchscreen
Display size
3.0 inches (~47.1% screen-to-body ratio)
Display resolution
240 x 320 pixels (~133 ppi pixel density)
OS
Android OS, v2.1 (Eclair)
Chipset
Qualcomm MSM7225 Snapdragon
CPU
528 MHz ARM 11
GPU
----
Internal memory
256 MB RAM, 512 MB ROM
Camera
3.15 MP, 2048 x 1536 pixels
Battery
Li-Ion 1170 mAh battery
Motorola TITANIUM

The Titanium isn't much more advanced, alas. It ships with only Android 2.1, which is a couple of generations behind at the time of this writing, and the iDEN network isn't known for fast data speeds. However, it has military-grade durability, Wi-Fi, corporate e-mail support, a decent keyboard, and it supports push-to-talk in the form of Nextel Direct Connect. Fortunately, Sprint has confirmed that Nextel Direct Connect phones will be compatible with future Sprint Direct Connect devices, so Titanium owners won't be left behind.

At first glance, you would be forgiven if you thought the Motorola Titanium was just another clone of the Motorola Droid Pro or the Motorola XPRT . It has a very similar candy bar silhouette, with the large touch-screen display sitting above a vertical keyboard. However, the Titanium is decidedly more rugged than the other two. Like most Nextel handsets, the Titanium is built tough, and is designed to meet Military Specification 810G for dust, shock, vibration, low pressure, solar radiation, high temperatures, and low temperatures. However, it's not water-resistant.

Underneath the display are five physical buttons corresponding to the Send, Menu, Home, Back, and End/Power keys. Immediately beneath that is the four-row QWERTY keyboard, which should be familiar to anyone who has played around with a BlackBerry Bold. The keys are rectangular and are sloped towards the middle for easier thumb typing. Unlike the layout on the Droid Pro and the XPRT, the numbers on the Titanium's keyboard are laid out in a grid on the left side, and there's a Search button on the lower right corner. While the keyboard may look compact, we actually found it easy to type due to the shape of the keys. The phone doesn't feel top heavy, but you do have to rest it on your fingers a little more when typing.

Motorola TITANIUM specifications:
Dimensions
4.71 x 2.44 x 0.53 inches (120 x 62 x 13 mm)
Weight
5.20 oz (147 g)
SIM
Mini-SIM
Display type
TFT capacitive touchscreen
Display size
3.1 inches
Display resolution
320 x 480 pixels
OS
Android 2.1
Chipset
----
CPU
Freescale Zeus 2.0 ARM1136, 504 MHz
GPU
Android PixelFlinger 1.2
Internal memory
512 MB Rom, 256 MB RAM
Camera
5 megapixels
Battery
Li-Ion 1820 mAh battery
Motorola XPRT

The back of the XPRT is slightly different from its Verizon cousin. The Droid Pro's smooth plastic battery door starts off thicker at the top, then slopes down just under the LED flash. Here the matte plastic comes with an etched pattern that provides some extra grip. And the phone remains the same thickness from top to bottom. It's still easy to pry off the back to get at the 1860 mAh Li Ion battery, micro SD and SIM card slots. You won't need to remove the battery to get at the cards -- a big plus.

As a fan of large smartphone screens, I assumed that the XPRT's 3.1-inch display would be too small for me to deal with, especially with a resolution of 320 x 480. Not so. It's fine for reading e-mail and news feeds, and even web browsing was comfortable. When I needed a bit of extra space, I just rotated the phone sideways (orientation switching is on by default). As with the Droid Pro, the trade-off is acceptable if you really want a full keyboard at the ready on the front.

The small keyboard is very BlackBerry-esque, and those used to this style should find it easy to get up to speed on the XPRT. The slanted keys help with accuracy, especially if you have no fingernails and type with the pad of your thumb. Typing with nails isn't as comfortable, but the keys don't fight against you too much thanks to the light matte coating. Still, a wider keyboard and keys would suit most serious typists better.
The biggest drawbacks are that the numbers don't get a dedicated row, there are no arrow keys, and that long-pressing the keys doesn't bring up the characters you can access by pressing the ALT key in most cases. The last issue may be because you'd have to move your thumb up to the touchscreen to choose the character, anyway, which isn't any more convenient than just pressing ALT. A long press will bring up alternate letters (ones with accents and the like) for relevant keys.

The lack of arrow keys is more of a pain, especially if you find it hard to accurately place the cursor using the touchscreen.

Motorola XPRT specifications:
Dimensions
120.4 x 60.9 x 13 mm (4.74 x 2.40 x 0.51 in)
Weight
145 g (5.11 oz)
SIM
Mini-SIM
Display type
TFT capacitive touchscreen, 16M colors
Display size
3.1 inches (~39.0% screen-to-body ratio)
Display resolution
320 x 480 pixels (~186 ppi pixel density)
OS
Android OS, v2.2 (Froyo)
Chipset
TI OMAP 3620 - 1000
CPU
1 GHz Cortex-A8
GPU
PowerVR SGX530
Internal memory
2 GB ROM, 256 RAM
Camera
5 MP, 2592 х 1944 pixels
Battery
Li-Ion 1860 mAh battery
Motorola CHARM

Strangely, we actually don't mind seeing the three touch sensitive buttons dominating the area directly beneath the touchscreen and above the QWERTY – that's because we didn't find ourselves accidentally activating them. On the left edge, you've got the typical microUSB port and decently sized volume rocker that offers a decent response when pressed. While on the top side, you'll find the 3.5mm headset jack and dedicated power button. Taking a peek at its rear, we're presented with the 3-megapixel camera, cutout for the speakerphone, and the somewhat novel (at this point) track-pad which Motorola aptly calls the “BACKTRACK.” Removing the rear cover requires a lot of force since you'll have to yank it off, but once that's accomplished, you'll have access to the microSD card slot, battery, and SIM card slot
Just when people were beginning to see RIM as the only one who can craft some stunning portrait style keyboards, Motorola does a fantastic job with the one on the CHARM. Although there is no spacing between buttons, they're raised enough and curved toward the middle to provide a good distinction between your thumbs. The soft plastic keys also offer a good tactile response when pressed, but it's the layout of the QWERTY that makes it so easy to use – it's actually similar to what you see on a regular keyboard. Additionally, there are some dedicated buttons on there that will give you access to specific functions and even 4-way directional keys to easily move around the cursor when typing a message.

Motorola CHARM specifications:
Dimensions
98.4 x 67.2 x 11.4 mm, 75 cc (3.87 x 2.65 x 0.45 in)
Weight
110 g (3.88 oz)
SIM
Mini-SIM
Display type
TFT capacitive touchscreen, 256K colors
Display size
2.8 inches (~36.7% screen-to-body ratio)
Display resolution
320 x 240 pixels (~143 ppi pixel density)
OS
Android OS, v2.1 (Eclair)
Chipset
TI OMAP 3410
CPU
600 MHz Cortex-A8
GPU
PowerVR SGX530
Internal memory
512 MB RAM; 512 MB ROM
Camera
3.15 MP, 2048x1536 pixels
Battery
Li-Ion 1130 mAh battery
Motorola Devour

the capacitive display is accurate and responsive. It includes an accelerometer and a proximity sensor, and you can adjust the wallpaper, brightness, and backlight time. You can't calibrate the display, but vibrating feedback helps ensure that you're selecting an option. The phone dialer and Android interface are similar to other handsets with the operating system. You can customize the five home screens with shortcuts, and the menu interface has an easy-to-use, icon-based design. Though the Devour has a physical keyboard, you also get an Android virtual keyboard.

The Devour's keyboard is spacious, but not perfect.

The Devour's slider mechanism is well constructed. The display locks into place on both ends, and you can open and close the phone with one hand. The keyboard is spacious and we appreciate that the keys are raised slightly. Yet, we had a complaint about the layout of the keys. Though normally we approve of dedicated number keys, the Devour makes a big sacrifice to get there. Because there are only three rows total, the space bar is squashed between the V and B buttons in the bottom row. That's not a placement we enjoy; in this case we'd rather see the space bar gets its own row with shortcut buttons and the function/shift controls.

Motorola Devour specifications:
Dimensions
4.55" x 2.4" x 0.61" (116 x 61 x 15.4 mm)
Weight
6.35 oz (180 g)
SIM
Mini-SIM
Display type
TFT capacitive touchscreen, 65K colors
Display size
3.1 inches
Display resolution
320 x 480 pixels
OS
Android OS, v1.6 (Donut)
Chipset
----
CPU
600 MHz Qualcomm S1 MSM7627
GPU
Adreno 200
Internal memory
256 MB RAM, 512 MB ROM
Camera
3.0 MP
Battery
Li-Ion 1420 mAh battery
Motorola Droid 2

Now, let's turn our attention to perhaps the Droid's single biggest pain point: the QWERTY keyboard. To get to it, you slide the phone open, which feels exactly like the first Droid -- there's no spring mechanism, and you've still got a little bit of friction to overcome as you slide. Some like it, some don't, but it feels solid without a hint of wobble. Anyhow, Motorola clearly heard the complaints loud and clear with the keyboard itself, killing off the oversized (and completely unnecessary) d-pad to the right side of the keys and giving each individual key a little bit of doming so that you can feel them out. Many old Droid owners have probably long since grown used to the flat, barren wasteland of their keyboards, of course -- but for anyone considering throwing their hat into the Droid arena for the first time, being able to feel those keys even just a little bit should make the transition far easier (seriously, they're just barely domed, but it's enough to get the job done).

Motorola's also made considerably better use of the keyboard's layout, too; heck, the original model inexplicably left two keys as blanks, an unprecedented move on a mobile device where real estate is always at a premium. No longer, though: the Alt and Shift keys are now double-width, the duplicates on the right side have been removed, a Back key has been added, and you've got a dedicated Alt Lock key, presumably useful for when you're going to be dealing with a lot of numbers. They were also able to eliminate the keyboard's Menu key by moving the screen's capacitive Menu button to the far left side, meaning it's now closest to the keyboard when it's open and pretty easily accessible. That's all well and good, but we wish Motorola would just pick a configuration for these capacitive buttons and run with it -- owners of Droids who are upgrading to the Droid 2 are going to have a devil of a time getting used to the new layout for at least the first few days of ownership, we imagine (fortunately, it's the same layout as the Droid X).

Motorola Droid 2 specifications:
Dimensions
116.3 x 60.5 x 13.7 mm (4.58 x 2.38 x 0.54 in)
Weight
169 g (5.96 oz)
SIM
Mini-SIM
Display type
TFT capacitive touchscreen, 16M colors
Display size
3.7 inches (~53.6% screen-to-body ratio)
Display resolution
480 x 854 pixels (~265 ppi pixel density)
OS
Android OS, v2.2 (Froyo)
Chipset
----
CPU
1 GHz
GPU
PowerVR SGX530
Internal memory
8GB ROM, 512 MB RAM
Camera
5 MP, 2592 х 1944 pixels
Battery
Li-Po 1400 mAh battery
Motorola DROID PRO

As for the keyboard, it’s small. It’s a tad cramped. But it has all the letters -- from A to Z -- and numbers -- 1 to 0 -- that you could ask for. Each key has an alternate function -- punctuation and the like -- which you trigger by first pressing the ALT key. There’s also a dedicated microphone button, so you don’t lose out on any one-touch voice-to-text action.

It's taken a little time to get used to having the the number keys span the top row, but that may just be because we're used to older Motorola keyboards (on which they were in a more traditional fashion). But we got over that.

We’re not sure how this hasn’t bothered us before, but you really should be able to long-press a physical key to trigger its alternate character. Can’t do it on the Droid Pro -- or any other phone, for that matter.

The keys themselves are pretty good. There’s just enough travel and clickability so that you know you pressed it. Each key is slightly slanted at the top, almost as if you started peeling back the skin from the top corners. It takes a little getting used to.

Motorola DROID PRO specifications:
Dimensions
119 x 60 x 11.7 mm (4.69 x 2.36 x 0.46 in)
Weight
134 g (4.73 oz)
SIM
Mini-SIM
Display type
TFT capacitive touchscreen, 16M colors
Display size
3.1 inches (~40.1% screen-to-body ratio)
Display resolution
320 x 480 pixels (~186 ppi pixel density)
OS
Android OS, v2.3 (Gingerbread)
Chipset
TI OMAP3620 - 1000
CPU
1 GHz Cortex-A8
GPU
PowerVR SGX530
Internal memory
512 MB RAM, 2 GB ROM
Camera
5 MP, 2592 х 1944 pixels
Battery
Li-Ion 1420 mAh battery
Motorola Flipout

Motorola seems quite keen on Android 2.1 having opted for that with the Defy as well as the Flipout. Really, we think Moto should bite the bullet and get with version 2.2 - but sadly it now looks like that won't happen. In fact the Defy and the Flipout share a lot in terms of user interface look and feel, it's just that the Flipout screen measures a squished 2.8 inches and offers 320 x 240 pixels while the Defy is a more conventional 3.7 inches and 480 x 854 pixels.

There is a relatively large amount of space allocated to the keyboard, and while it's taller than usual, the width available is on a par with bigger smartphones. So in theory, there's no reason the keyboard shouldn't give the best of its rivals a run for their money. And, in practice, it isn't bad. The keys are individually raised, so they're relatively easy to find with a fingertip, and the number row is as large as the rest of the keys. There are Alt-key combinations for a lot of commonly used symbols, too.

There's even a little navigation pad, which you can use to move around within longer texts in order to target an editing point. But the keys aren't as responsive as we'd like, and our movement around them was slower than it should have been. Not perfect, by any means, but not too bad, then. You don't have to use the physical keyboard, incidentally. If you don't want to flip it out, just tap a text entry box and you get an on-screen alternative. This is pretty small, and probably kiddy-sized hands will do better with it than we did. However, we still managed to tap away at a speed very similar to that we got with the physical keyboard after a fair bit of practising.

Motorola flipout is really interesting phone. Now we haven't got such little transformers -- now we think about Android and iOS operating sytems war and forget about unique phone body design

Motorola Flipout specifications:
Dimensions
67 x 67 x 17 mm, 76 cc (2.64 x 2.64 x 0.67 in)
Weight
120 g (4.23 oz)
SIM
Mini-SIM
Display type
TFT capacitive touchscreen, 256K colors
Display size
2.8 inches (~54.1% screen-to-body ratio)
Display resolution
320 x 240 pixels (~143 ppi pixel density)
OS
Android OS, v2.1 (Eclair)
Chipset
TI OMAP 3410
CPU
600 MHz Cortex-A8
GPU
PowerVR SGX530
Internal memory
512 MB RAM, 512 MB ROM
Camera
3.15 MP, 2048 x 1536 pixels
Battery
Li-Ion 1130 mAh battery
Motorola FLIPSIDE

With its silver-rimmed face and thick black body, the Flipside most closely resembles the Motorola Backflip. Instead of the Backflip's reverse flip design, however, the Flipside is a traditional slider. As for its looks, at best they're regulation: black and rectangular with today's seemingly obligatory rounded corners and a soft-touch back cover. There's very little style and no flourish. Instead you get a stocky phone that's 4.3 inches tall by 2.2 inches wide and 0.6 inch thick, and a hefty 5.1 ounces. The keyboard contributes much density, sure, but we've still seen slimmer slider models. Although the Flipside feels rather blocky in the hand, it fits just fine on the ear.

"Utilitarian" may not sound complimentary for a keyboard, but let this be the exception. The Flipside's QWERTY keyboard may be stylistically uninspired, but its proportions provide roominess without extraneous width, and the raised, matte keys are easy to get around on. Our one complaint is the grainy texture, which feels a tad rough under the fingers, and rasps as you type.

Motorola FLIPSIDE specifications:
Dimensions
109.5 x 57.5 x 15 mm (4.31 x 2.26 x 0.59 in)
Weight
145 g (5.11 oz)
SIM
Mini-SIM
Display type
TFT capacitive touchscreen
Display size
3.1 inches (~45.4% screen-to-body ratio)
Display resolution
320 x 480 pixels (~186 ppi pixel density)
OS
Android OS, v2.2 (Froyo)
Chipset
TI OMAP 3410
CPU
720 MHz Cortex-A8
GPU
PowerVR SGX530
Internal memory
512 MB RAM, 512 MB ROM
Camera
3.15 MP, 2048 x 1536 pixels
Battery
Li-Ion 1170 mAh battery
Motorola Droid 4

Of course, the shining and defining star of the Droid 4 is its QWERTY slider. It's here that we truly see an investment in improved user experience on Motorola's end. The slide-out pad is, quite simply, one of the best available on the market. Fans of the OG Droid's terribly flat and difficult-to-master setup have been treated to marginally better layouts with each successive iteration. But this newest entry takes the formula employed by last year's model and makes it much more intuitive. The same raised, slightly curved, well-spaced plastic buttons permeate the keyboard across five rows, with the uppermost reserved solely for numbers. While directional keys are present, shortcuts for Android navigation are absent. But we're guessing most users will naturally reach above to manipulate the capacitive buttons, anyway. A soft backlight, triggered by an ambient sensor, surrounds the base of each individual key, which should make texting or emailing in the dark a non-issue for power users.

Functioning much the way it always has, the slider mechanism is, as before, stiff and missing that comforting snap to lock. That said, it does give off the impression of durability, so we'll err on the side of Moto's design choice here. Once opened, the phone instantly resorts to landscape mode and a mere button press triggers Google's search app, listing whatever contacts or apps that match your entered text. Swype does come pre-installed, so if you happen to tire of physical buttons, you can always opt for that alternative touch option. Given the intrinsic QWERTY nature of the Droid line, however, we don't anticipate you'll make much use of that software.

Motorola Droid 4 specifications:
Dimensions
127 x 67.3 x 12.7 mm (5.0 x 2.65 x 0.5 in)
Weight
178.9 g (6.28 oz)
SIM
Micro-SIM
Display type
TFT capacitive touchscreen, 16M colors
Display size
4.0 inches (~51.6% screen-to-body ratio)
Display resolution
540 x 960 pixels (~275 ppi pixel density)
OS
Android OS, v4.0 (Ice Cream Sandwich)
Chipset
TI OMAP 4430
CPU
Dual-core 1.2 GHz Cortex-A9
GPU
PowerVR SGX540
Internal memory
16 GB ROM, 1 GB RAM
Camera
8 MP, 3264 x 2448 pixels
Battery
Non-removable Li-Ion 1785 mAh battery
Motorola Photon Q 4G LTE

Anyone looking to purchase a handset in this category is willing to sacrifice thinness for the ability to type comfortably, accurately and quickly with tactile feedback. If it doesn't perform to expectations, the rest of the phone's selling points are swiftly rendered moot. Fortunately, the Photon Q holds steady, proudly flaunting one of the nicest Android slide-out keyboards we've had the opportunity to play with in recent memory. In fact, it brought back pleasant memories of our precious time with the Droid 4, also made by Motorola. The keys aren't too large or too small. They're raised, offering a decent amount of travel, and they bulge out ever-so slightly. What's more, they're reasonably spaced out so as to prevent your fingers from mashing neighboring keys -- at the same time, they're not so far apart from each other that you're slowing down your WPM rate.

This is one of the finest physical keyboards we've used on an Android device in quite some time.

We also appreciate the layout of the Photon board. Motorola has opted to use the five-row setup, which means you'll get a dedicated number row rather than being forced to become good friends with the shift key. These buttons are laid out in identical fashion to the Droid 4, again choosing to eschew the usual Android navigation keys for other useful functions.

The edge-lit keyboard utilized on the Photon Q isn't a new concept, but Motorola's added a little flourish to the functionality to make it even better: the ability to adjust the backlight brightness to your own desired level. You can also opt for automatic mode, if you prefer, which will change your keyboard's brightness to fit your current lighting. To change your preferences, you can find the adjustment options in the settings menu under Language & Input > Keyboard backlight.

As for the slider mechanism, it feels fluid, but not too loose. There's just the right amount of resistance when you push the slider out with your thumbs, and the automatic opener catches just about halfway to escort the keyboard the rest of the way. It feels slightly loose when we close it, but not to the point of concern.

Lastly, how fast do our free-flying fingers go when using the Photon's QWERTY? To answer this question, we downloaded a third-party app that uses a standard test to measure words per minute and we compared our results between the stock virtual keyboard (autocorrect turned off) and the physical one. We also gave our fingers a few days to become accustomed to the latter, just to make sure we were able to work out all the jitters. Our best scores were 40WPM on the QWERTY (with 92 percent accuracy) and 28WPM on the virtual keypad (with 84 percent accuracy). As a disclaimer, it's likely yours truly isn't the fastest typist out there, and we may have achieved better results with a third-party virtual keyboard like SwiftKey, but we wanted to at least demonstrate the difference between the two major input methods in terms of general speed.

Motorola Photon Q 4G LTE specifications:
Dimensions
126.5 x 66 x 13.7 mm (4.98 x 2.60 x 0.54 in)
Weight
170.1 g (6.00 oz)
SIM
Non-removable
Display type
TFT capacitive touchscreen, 16M colors
Display size
4.3 inches (~61.1% screen-to-body ratio)
Display resolution
540 x 960 pixels (~256 ppi pixel density)
OS
Android OS, v4.0.4 (Ice Cream Sandwich)
Chipset
CPU
Dual-core 1.5 GHz
GPU
Adreno 225
Internal memory
8 GB ROM, 1 GB RAM
Camera
8 MP, 3264 x 2448 pixels
Battery
Non-removable Li-Ion 1785 mAh battery
Kyocera Milano

The Milano has an elongated oval shape similar to that of the Pepperidge Farm cookies that share its name (minus the delicious cookie part). At 4.1 inches by 2.4 inches by 0.7 inch, the Milano feels tiny in comparison to many other Android phones. The full QWERTY keyboard on the phone permitted rapid typing and it was comfortable to use, but the slide-out keyboard mechanism seemed somewhat flimsy--and significantly less solid than the ones we've seen recently on the Motorola Droid 3 and on both the 3G and 4G versions of HTC's MyTouch Slide.

The 3-inch display has a considerable air gap between the screen and the glass, which made images and text difficult to see outside. As its substandard resolution of 320 by 240 pixels might lead you to expect, the display was anything but sharp. Images and text looked grainy and color was mediocre, though the screen was responsive to touch input. One other disadvantage of the small screen was that the onscreen keyboard was difficult to type on; I recommend that you stick to using the physical keyboard.

Kyocera Milano specifications:
Dimensions
105 x 61 x 17.1 mm (4.13 x 2.40 x 0.67 in)
Weight
158 g (5.57 oz)
SIM
Mini-SIM
Display type
TFT capacitive touchscreen, 256K colors
Display size
3.0 inches (~43.5% screen-to-body ratio)
Display resolution
240 x 320 pixels (~133 ppi pixel density)
OS
Android OS, v2.3 (Gingerbread)
Chipset
Qualcomm MSM7627T
CPU
800 MHz
GPU
Adreno 205
Internal memory
512 MB ROM, 512 MB RAM
Camera
3.15 MP, 2048 x 1536 pixels
Battery
Li-Ion 1490 mAh battery
LG Rumor Reflex

The LG Rumor Reflex measures 4.2 inches tall, 2.1 inches wide, and is 0.6 inch thick. It weighs 4.7 ounces, which is light for a phone that has a physical keyboard. Though that keyboard also makes it thick, the Rumor Reflex has a petite build and it fits compactly in my hand. Also, it easily slipped into my clutch, and into my jeans pocket.

Front and center is a 3-inch WQVGA capacitive touch screen. Its resolution is only 400x240 pixels and it can display only 262,000 colors, so it's not the crispest or most vibrant display out there. Videos and games are pixelated and images, like its set of default wallpaper, are grainy. On the upside, though, the simple menu icons and text are legible. Yet, what I liked most about the display was that it was responsive. I could scroll through menu items, type on the virtual keyboard (if I didn't want to use the physical keyboard), and click on links with ease.

The QWERTY keyboard behind the display lights up with a soft blue glow and has four rows of keys, including directional keys, a function and shift key, a backspace, and a symbol key that gives you access to 16 cute icons and smiley faces. However, unless you're sending texts to another Rumor Reflex, don't expect other devices to be able to see these colorful emoticons. Although I like that the keys are raised and are easy to push, they're too small. I have petite hands already, so I can't imagine anyone with even slightly larger mitts trying to type. The slider mechanism is sturdy, and easily snaps back and forth.

LG Rumor Reflex specifications:
Dimensions
107 x 53 x 15.2 mm (4.21 x 2.09 x 0.60 in)
Weight
133 g (4.69 oz)
SIM
Mini-SIM
Display type
TFT capacitive touchscreen, 256K colors
Display size
3.0 inches (~45.2% screen-to-body ratio)
Display resolution
240 x 400 pixels (~155 ppi pixel density)
OS
Android OS, v2.3 (Gingerbread)
Chipset
----
CPU
480 MHz
GPU
----
Internal memory
480 MB ROM, 256 MB RAM
Camera
2 MP, 1600 x 1200 pixels
Battery
Li-Ion 1000 mAh battery
LG Enlighten

The overall design of the LG Enlighten isn’t too remarkable, as it is all-black in color and has a smoke-gray chrome rim around the edge of the display. But for the price, it feels well made and fits comfortably in the hand. On the front is a small 3.2” HVGA (320x480) TFT display, which is what we saw last year on the LG Vortex. It does an OK job, as text is legible and images look good, but for some reason it is missing an ambient light sensor to automatically adjust its backlight when moving between a dark and bright environment. We can understand LG not using a larger WVGA display to keep costs down, but they still should have included an ambient light sensor. There is a proximity sensor that does turn the display off when it is next to your face during a phone call.

The sliding mechanisms on the LG Enlighten is spring-loaded, just like on the LG Ally, and doesn’t require you to move it all the way for it to open the keyboard from underneath. We like that the Enlighten has a 4-row keyboard with dedicated number keys across the top, and that all they keys are individual, instead of being one large membrane. Though after typing on it for a few minutes, we noticed that there is not much space between the keys, which does increase the amount of accidental key-presses if you’re not paying attention. Having the bottom row split by the Space key is also kind strange and requires some getting used to. Still, LG does a decent job with the keyboard considering the limited amount of space for it to fit into.

LG Enlighten specifications:
Dimensions
114 x 58 x 15 mm (4.49 x 2.28 x 0.59 in)
Weight
157 g (5.54 oz)
SIM
Mini-SIM
Display type
TFT capacitive touchscreen, 256K colors
Display size
3.2 inches (~46.1% screen-to-body ratio)
Display resolution
320 x 480 pixels (~180 ppi pixel density)
OS
Android OS, v2.3 (Gingerbread)
Chipset
Qualcomm MSM7627T
CPU
800 MHz
GPU
Adreno 200
Internal memory
150 MB
Camera
3.15 MP, 2048 x 1536 pixels
Battery
Li-Ion 1540 mAh battery
LG Optimus Chat

The LG Optimus Chat aims to bring Qwerty keyboard goodness to the Android masses. It's not ashamed to wear its budget credentials on its sleeve, though, so don't expect a premium experience.

Physical keyboards on smart phones have become the exception rather than the rule, now that we live in the age of the touchscreen. Thankfully, the Chat's keyboard is excellent. The buttons are spaced out well, and they're a pleasure to prod and press. The Chat's Qwerty keyboard is a delight when it comes to typing on the go.

The only drawbacks are the small space button, which can make high-speed typing problematic, and the rather flat profile of the buttons. They sit almost flush with the base of the keyboard, and this can make them hard to distinguish at times. Keyboard aside, the Chat offers little in the way of surprises. It looks and feels very much like a budget handset, with a predominantly plastic casing and a 320x480-pixel, 2.8-inch touchscreen.

LG has used touch-sensitive buttons for the home, menu, search and back commands. The touchscreen is less than ideal for browsing detailed websites, but, on the plus side, it uses capacitive touch technology, so it's more responsive than cheaper resistive screens. It also means that the Chat supports the pinch-to-zoom command, allowing you to enlarge Web pages, photos and Google Maps with a simple gesture.

LG Optimus Chat specifications:
Dimensions
109 x 59 x 16 mm (4.29 x 2.32 x 0.63 in)
Weight
122 g (4.30 oz)
SIM
Mini-SIM
Display type
TFT touchscreen, 256K colors
Display size
2.8 inches (~36.3% screen-to-body ratio)
Display resolution
320 x 480 pixels (~206 ppi pixel density)
OS
Android OS, v2.2 (Froyo)
Chipset
----
CPU
600 MHz
GPU
Adreno 200
Internal memory
140 MB ROM, 512 MB RAM
Camera
3.15 MP, 2048 x 1536 pixels
Battery
Li-Ion 1500 mAh battery
LG Optimus Pro C660

The phone has 2.3 inch (240 x 320 pixels) TFT capacitive touch screen display and a full QWERTY keyboard. The phone has nice curve shape and a good build quality. It is 12.9 mm thick and weighs 129g.
There is a physical menu button, home button, back button and a search button below the display. The numbers are on the left on the QWERTY keyboard with an alt option to switch between alphabets and numbers / symbols. There are shortcut buttons on the last row of the keyboard for the upper case characters, browser, calendar and email. The delete key and the enter key are on the far right. The keyboard is not very comfortable to type if you have large fingers, but you can manage to get the words right if you have smaller fingers like me.

LG Optimus Pro C660 specifications:
Dimensions
119.5 x 59.7 x 12.9 mm (4.70 x 2.35 x 0.51 in)
Weight
129 g (4.55 oz)
SIM
Mini-SIM
Display type
TFT capacitive touchscreen, 256K colors
Display size
2.8 inches (~34.0% screen-to-body ratio)
Display resolution
240 x 320 pixels (~143 ppi pixel density)
OS
Android OS, v2.3.3 (Gingerbread)
Chipset
Qualcomm MSM7227T Snapdragon
CPU
800 MHz ARM 11
GPU
Adreno 200
Internal memory
256 MB RAM, 512 MB ROM
Camera
3.15 MP, 2048 x 1536 pixels
Battery
Li-Ion 1500 mAh battery
LG Optimus Q2

Released in September 2011, LG Optimus Q2 LU8800 has 4.0” IPS LCD capacitive touchscreen and 16M colors display, this screen size is good for watching videos and gamming results, color definition is quit sharp and display is bright. This device has QWERTY keyboard which is ideal for quick text and massage typing as well as it makes chatting even faster. Although it doesn’t supports GPRS and EDGE but it supports 3G, speedy data performance provided. Dual Core 1.2G processor included which performs quickly so your videos never stop for buffering and the games will run smoothly, 1GB RAM included so multitasking will never waist time for waiting.

This hand set has 8GB internal memory not at the best while others has 16GB to 32GB, microSD card slot available where you can put a up to 32GB memory card. LG Optimus Q2 LU8800 has Autofocus 5MP camera with LED Flash and Geo-tagging, you can record videos and can shoot sharp images, the camera result in low light is not at the best but reasonably good, secondary VGA front facing camera included fro video chatting and calling. This handset support 2.3.4 Gingerbread version Android OS, that’s much better because many of LG phones support just 2.3.

LG Optimus Q2 specifications:
Dimensions
123 x 65 x 12.3 mm (4.84 x 2.56 x 0.48 in)
Weight
147 g (5.19 oz)
SIM
Mini-SIM
Display type
IPS LCD capacitive touchscreen, 16M colors
Display size
4.0 inches (~57.0% screen-to-body ratio)
Display resolution
480 x 800 pixels (~233 ppi pixel density)
OS
Android OS, v2.3.4 (Gingerbread)
Chipset
Nvidia Tegra 2 AP20H
CPU
Dual-core 1.2 GHz Cortex-A9
GPU
ULP GeForce
Internal memory
8 GB ROM, 1 GB RAM
Camera
5 MP, 2592 х 1944 pixels
Battery
Li-Ion 1500 mAh battery
LG Ally

The LG Ally has a full QWERTY keyboard.

The interface on the LG Ally is that of the standard Android UI; there's no custom interface here like you would expect from HTC or Samsung. Like with the Nexus One, it's pretty easy and intuitive; you get up to five home screens that you can customize with widgets and shortcuts, and the main menu is laid out in a simple cascading grid. The phone dialer is easy to use, and if you don't want to use the physical keyboard, you are free to use the Android virtual keyboard, too.

Underneath the display are two touch-sensor keys for the Back and the Search functions. Below those are four physical keys--the Call, Home, menu pop-up, and End/Power keys--laid out in a slight curve. The volume rocker and charger jack are on the left spine, and the right is home to the microSD card slot and dedicated camera button. A 3.5mm headset jack sits on the top with the camera lens and LED flash on the back.

When you slide the display to the right, you'll reveal a four-row QWERTY keyboard. The screen automatically adjusts from portrait to landscape mode when that happens. We're really big fans of the keyboard, much more so than the keyboard on the Droid. It's roomy, there's a dedicated number row, and the keys are a good size. They're raised above the surface and are separate and distinct from each other, resulting in a super tactile feel that allowed us to type with speed. Also on the right of keyboard is a square navigation toggle, which is a nice alternative to just using the touch screen.

LG Ally specifications:
Dimensions
4.56 x 2.22 x 0.62 inches (116 x 56 x 16 mm)
Weight
5.57 oz (158 g)
SIM
Mini-SIM
Display type
TFT capacitive touchscreen, 256K colors
Display size
3.2 inches
Display resolution
480 x 800 pixels (~292 ppi pixel density)
OS
Android (2.2, 2.1)
Chipset
Qualcomm Snapdragon S1 MSM7627
CPU
Single core, 600 MHz, ARM11
GPU
Adreno 200
Internal memory
256 MB RAM / 512 MB ROM
Camera
3.2 MP
Battery
Li-Ion 1500 mAh battery
LG Optimus F3Q

All that added thickness helps accommodate the slide-out QWERTY keyboard. It's got the same layout as the Enact, with a full number row and navigation arrows, but the design sees some notable changes. The keys are flatter and more oblong, instead of the Enact's sloping, more-angular keys—it feels more like a membrane remote control, which I'm not really a fan of. Feedback is still nice and clicky, though, and the keys are spaced well enough.

The 4-inch, 800-by-480-pixel LCD isn't particularly sharp at 233 ppi, but it doesn't look too bad. Viewing angle is nice and wide, colors appear accurate, and maximum screen brightness is sufficient for outdoor use. Below the display are capacitive Back, Home, Recent Apps, and Menu buttons.
The LG Optimus F3Q is a decent keyboarded Android phone, but if you don't absolutely need a physical keyboard, there are much better options for your money on T-Mobile. You can grab the Nexus 5$378.99 at Amazon direct from Google for $350, or buy it through T-Mobile for 24 monthly payments of $16.50, which is just $3.50 more per month than the F3Q. The Optimus F6 currently goes for $240, and it's a sizeable upgrade over the Optimus F3, which is the F3Q sans keyboard. Keyboard diehards will be satisfied with the F3Q, but just know you're paying a pretty hefty premium for the privilege of physical keys on an otherwise mediocre smartphone.

LG Optimus F3Q specifications:
Dimensions
121.9 x 64.8 x 14 mm (4.80 x 2.55 x 0.55 in)
Weight
159.9 g (5.61 oz)
SIM
Mini-SIM
Display type
IPS LCD capacitive touchscreen, 16M colors
Display size
4.0 inches (~57.7% screen-to-body ratio)
Display resolution
480 x 800 pixels (~233 ppi pixel density)
OS
Android OS, v4.1.2 (Jelly Bean)
Chipset
Qualcomm MSM8930 Snapdragon 400
CPU
Dual-core 1.2 GHz Krait
GPU
Adreno 305
Internal memory
4 GB ROM, 1 GB RAM
Camera
5 MP, 2560 x 1920 pixels
Battery
Li-Ion 2460 mAh battery
LG Mach

The 5 row keyboard on the Mach is easy to get used to and we were quickly typing accurately, but it did not have the inviting quality that the Photon Q’s keyboard had. The keys are well spaced, but adding the 5th row makes them a little shorter than we’d prefer. Still, we’d gladly trade those few and far between accidental presses for the presence of the dedicated number row.

The 4-inch screen means that the Mach sports a well-sized keyboard, though the keys don’t quite fill the available space. Overall, the layout is good with only a few missteps. We’re glad to see a dedicated number row along the top and arrow keys, and we also like that the comma gets its own key, unlike the first generation Samsung Stratosphere. The Space bar needs to be wider – we accidentally hit the period key a few times while typing fast. We prefer the Motorola Photon Q’s layout, which has a spacious … space bar.

We also couldn’t type as fast as we’re used to thanks to the stiffness of the keys. It took more work to press them, slowing us down. Things improved the more we got used to the keys, but speed typers may not like the overall experience. (Side note: People with fingernails will appreciate that the pillowed keys aren’t too rounded and have a matte coating so nails don’t slip off.)

LG Mach specifications:
Dimensions
117.9 x 65 x 12.2 mm (4.64 x 2.56 x 0.48 in)
Weight
167.8 g (5.89 oz)
SIM
Mini-SIM
Display type
IPS LCD capacitive touchscreen, 16M colors
Display size
4.0 inches (~59.4% screen-to-body ratio)
Display resolution
480 x 800 pixels (~233 ppi pixel density)
OS
Android OS, v4.0 (Ice Cream Sandwich)
Chipset
Qualcomm MSM8960 Snapdragon
CPU
Dual-core 1.2 GHz Krait
GPU
Adreno 225
Internal memory
8 GB ROM, 1 GB RAM
Camera
5 MP, 2592 х 1944 pixels
Battery
Li-Ion 1700 mAh battery
LG Enact

The reasonably priced LG Enact has 4G LTE, a useful and comfortable sliding keyboard, and an optional user interface for smartphone beginners.
One of the main features of the LG Enact is the physical QWERTY keyboard. Sliding it open and closed is pretty easy to do (even with one hand) with a better feel to it than the Pantech Marauder and Samsung Galaxy Stratosphere II. Once it is opened, we are presented with a nice 5-row keyboard with dedicated number keys across the top. In fact, the layout is pretty much similar to the Stratosphere II. Using the QWERTY keyboard is a pleasant experience, as the keys have a nice size and feel to them, but larger hands may have an issue, as there isn’t much space between the keys. Our only complaint here is that the backlighting for the keyboard is not very bright, which does make it less visible when there is low surrounding light. In our opinion, the keyboard’s backlight needs to be brighter. Because of this, the Motorola DROID 4 still remains king, as it has a larger keyboard with enough backlighting for it to be visible at night.

Though the smartphone is rather petite, its five-row sliding keyboard beneath is generously sized and spaced. It's also easy to push out and in, due to the sturdy snapping mechanism. The keys were not so flush that they were difficult to feel out, nor were they so bulbous that it looked awkward. Each button took very little effort to press and I like how the space bar in particular is so wide. Included in the keyboard are four navigational keys, shortcut keys to turn on vibrate, and a launch button to open a memo app. There are also PC-esque functions you can carry out. For instance, if you press down the "fn" button, followed by either the letters A, C, or V, you will be able to select all, copy, or paste text, respectively.

LG Enact specifications:
Dimensions
111 x 52.3 x 15.8 mm (4.37 x 2.06 x 0.62 in)
Weight
169.8 g (5.96 oz)
SIM
Mini-SIM
Display type
TFT capacitive touchscreen, 16M colors
Display size
4.0 inches (~78.4% screen-to-body ratio)
Display resolution
480 x 800 pixels (~233 ppi pixel density)
OS
Android OS, v4.1.2 (Jelly Bean)
Chipset
Qualcomm MSM8930 Snapdragon 400
CPU
Dual-core 1.2 GHz Krait
GPU
Adreno 305
Internal memory
8 GB ROM, 1 GB RAM
Camera
5 MP, 2592 х 1944 pixels, autofocus
Battery
Li-Ion 2460 mAh battery
Huawei U8350, Huawei Boulder

We were shocked when we first picked up the Boulder to discover its bezel was actually made of aluminum. With a smooth, uniform finish and high-quality plastic keys, it is a relatively well-made device. The keys don’t rattle, and are sprightly to the touch; the right-side volume rocker feels lively, and for such a small device it possesses an assured weight to it. The keyboard in many ways surpasses the quality of phones three times the cost: we were able to touch-type on our first try, and each button has a satisfying click. Their rounded shape makes it easy to delineate between keys, and the placement of each is first-rate.

Above the keyboard is the standard Android quartet: Home, Menu, Back and Search, and between them in a four-way directional pad with a selection button in the middle. Each of these is dramatically oversized, but nothing compared to the massive Call and End buttons right underneath the screen. It seems like they padded out the size of each function key because they didn’t want to invest in a bigger screen.

Huawei U8350, Huawei Boulder specifications:
Dimensions
115 x 62.8 x 9.9 mm (4.53 x 2.47 x 0.39 in)
Weight
105 g (3.70 oz)
SIM
Mini-SIM
Display type
TFT capacitive touchscreen, 256K colors
Display size
2.6 inches (~29.0% screen-to-body ratio)
Display resolution
320 x 240 pixels (~154 ppi pixel density)
OS
Android OS, v2.2 (Froyo)
Chipset
Qualcomm MSM7225 Snapdragon
CPU
528 MHz ARM 11
GPU
----
Internal memory
512 MB ROM, 256 MB RAM
Camera
3.2 MP, 2048 x 1536 pixels
Battery
Li-Ion 1200 mAh battery
Samsung GT-B5512 Galaxy Y Pro Duos

This is the differentiator between Galaxy Y Pro Duos and Galaxy Y Duos, the latter is full touch, giving users an option to select if they are the qwerty guys or love full touch. Galaxy Y Pro Duos has the best of both, giving qwerty and type. Qwerty is associated with email and document editing for fast typing on the physical qwerty buttons. This phone has nice well laid out buttons, with the usual shortcuts to enable fast activity. The dial application is operated via touch but is also accessible via the optical track-pad. Plus if you lock it with the usual screen lock you will still need to unlock via touch.

Added below there as an easy scroll is the optical track-pad, to make it easier to scroll the menus up, down, left and centre.

Samsung GT-B5512 Galaxy Y Pro Duos specifications:
Dimensions
110.8 x 63.5 x 11.9 mm (4.36 x 2.5 x 0.47 in)
Weight
112.3 g (3.95 oz)
SIM
Dual SIM (Mini-SIM)
Display type
TFT capacitive touchscreen, 256K colors
Display size
2.6 inches (~29.8% screen-to-body ratio)
Display resolution
320 x 240 pixels (~154 ppi pixel density)
OS
Android OS, v2.3 (Gingerbread)
Chipset
----
CPU
832 MHz
GPU
Broadcom VideoCore IV
Internal memory
512 MB ROM, 290 MB RAM
Camera
3.15 MP, 2048 x 1536 pixels
Battery
Li-Ion 1350 mAh battery
Samsung GT-B7800 Galaxy M Pro

Having both a touchscreen and a physical keyboard means they complement each other pretty well for making selections faster and typing easier. When we add several enterprise features that the Samsung Galaxy M Pro sports, like Cisco Mobile, WebEx and Sybase Afaria for corporate phone management, it certainly becomes a suitable handset if you are the type that has to wear a suit all day.

Keying in those texts, ChatON messages or status updates is pretty quick with the spacious physical keyboard, and a bonus of having half the phone filled with buttons, is that the screen doesn't get covered by a virtual keyboard, so visually the real estate is the same while typing.

The Samsung Galaxy M Pro left a very good impression with us. Its main selling point, the portrait physical QWERTY keyboard, seems well-executed, with spacious key canvass and, since the handset is pretty wide, the buttons are large enough to avoid pressing them in tandem. The phone is also pretty thin and very light, and has a fairly distinct two-tone chassis with a brushed metal element on the back cover, giving it a more premium feel.

When we add a 5MP camera with LED flash, the latest Android 2.3 Gingerbread version, and the enterprise features, the Samsung Galaxy M Pro seems a worthy contender to battle for the attention of the corporate IT department, or anyone who digs this form factor without willing to break the bank for it. The phone could sway some BlackBerry fans which are looking to make the switch to Android, but don't want to give up their thumbboards, but we'll have to get a finalized unit of the Samsung Galaxy M Pro in order to determine how likely this scenario might be.

Samsung GT-B7800 Galaxy M Pro specifications:
Dimensions
113.5 x 66 x 10 mm (4.47 x 2.60 x 0.39 in)
Weight
108.4 g (3.81 oz)
SIM
Mini-SIM
Display type
TFT capacitive touchscreen, 16M colors
Display size
2.66 inches (~28.1% screen-to-body ratio)
Display resolution
480 x 320 pixels (~217 ppi pixel density)
OS
Android OS, v2.3 (Gingerbread)
Chipset
----
CPU
1 GHz
GPU
Adreno 205
Internal memory
----
Camera
5 MP, 2592 х 1944 pixels
Battery
Li-Ion 1350 mAh battery
Samsung GT-B5510 Galaxy Y Pro

Now it’s time to say a few words about one of Samsung Galaxy Y Pro Duos’ most important assets – its physical portrait QWERTY keyboard. The phone is relatively wide, with enough space for the keyboard; it is chiclet-style, with each dome separated from the others with enough space to easily feel the buttons by touch. There is a function key down right, which can be assigned to any action of your choosing, too. The only gripe is the somewhat shallow travel, which takes getting used to.

Samsung GT-B5510 Galaxy Y Pro specifications:
Dimensions
110.8 x 63.5 x 11.5 mm (4.36 x 2.5 x 0.45 in)
Weight
108.6 g (3.81 oz)
SIM
Mini-SIM
Display type
TFT capacitive touchscreen, 256K colors
Display size
2.6 inches (~29.8% screen-to-body ratio)
Display resolution
320 x 240 pixels (~154 ppi pixel density)
OS
Android OS, v2.3 (Gingerbread)
Chipset
----
CPU
832 MHz
GPU
Broadcom VideoCore IV
Internal memory
512 ROM, 382 RAM
Camera
3.15 MP, 2048 x 1536 pixels
Battery
Li-Ion 1200 mAh battery
Samsung GT-B7510 Galaxy Pro

The handset has the usual messaging device layout, with the landscape screen at the top and a QWERTY keyboard nestled beneath. However, in between these Samsung has added four Android buttons for menu, home, back and search. But while the power button is usually found at the top of most Android phones, Samsung has move it to the right hand side on this device. There's no dedicated camera button, which is a bit of a pain, but there is a volume rocker switch on the left hand side and a standard 3.5mm headphone jack at the top. The top is also home to the microUSB port that's hidden behind a sliding flap. As you'd expect this is used for both charging the phone, as well as syncing it with a PC.

Having dropped the ball on the screen, you might think that Samsung would have made up ground when it comes to the keyboard. After all, this isn't exactly the first Samsung phone to comes with a keyboard, as it's previously offered keyboard-shod handset like the Omnia Pro and Genio QWERTY. Unfortunately, though, the keyboard used here isn’t one of its finest efforts. It's made form a single membrane with the square-ish keys stamped into it and each key having an angled edge. However, the keys aren’t all that comfortable to type on, partly because they need to be pressed with a bit more force than other messaging keyboards we've used, such as those on the HTC ChaCha. Also the layout isn't great, especially if you're moving over to it from a Blackberry device. The reason for this is that the bottom row of keys have been shifted one key to the left to make room for the up arrow button. As a result you may find yourself making typos when it comes to hitting keys on this line. It's also a bit annoying that the Alt key has been moved to the bottom row on the keyboard as it feels slightly out of place here.

Samsung GT-B7510 Galaxy Pro specifications:
Dimensions
108.6 x 66.7 x 10.7 mm (4.28 x 2.63 x 0.42 in)
Weight
103.4 g (3.63 oz)
SIM
Mini-SIM
Display type
TFT capacitive touchscreen, 256K colors
Display size
2.8 inches (~33.5% screen-to-body ratio)
Display resolution
320 x 240 pixels (~143 ppi pixel density)
OS
Android OS, v2.2.2 (Froyo)
Chipset
----
CPU
800 MHz ARMv6
GPU
Adreno 200
Internal memory
512 MB RAM, 512 MB ROM
Camera
3.15 MP, 2048 x 1536 pixels
Battery
Li-Ion 1350 mAh battery
Samsung SCH-i405 Stratosphere

It's more difficult to slide open the Stratosphere's keyboard, but it feels less likely to fall apart than the fast-springing Epic slider; we're not sure if that's a false sense of comfort or if it really is a more solid mechanism. When we first began using the phone, it almost took a little too much effort to get the keyboard to open with two hands, and was a nearly impossible feat to accomplish one-handed. Not surprisingly, the slider softened with enough use, but was still rather stiff.

The keyboard isn't comfortable to use for long periods of time. The keyboard itself was less comfortable to use for long periods of time. It utilizes a five-row pad with a dedicated row of numbers, which we feel is a must-have for long-term typing. In direct comparison, the Stratosphere's keys were wider and shorter than the Epic 4G; as a result, the main board was a tad wider. While the Epic's keys were flat and offered just the right amount of bounce, the Stratosphere opted for rounded ones that provide an additional amount of give -- this will ultimately be a matter of personal preference, of course, but our hands felt better using Sprint's iteration.

The performance we got out of the Stratosphere was exactly what we'd expect from a device with Galaxy S-class specs, thanks to its 1GHz single-core Hummingbird CPU. Before we venture into benchmark scores, the touchscreen was very responsive, and in real-life use we only experienced the occasional lag; even in those cases, however, it was minimal and didn't add much frustration. Power users who absolutely need the speediest and most powerful phones won't want to bother with the Stratosphere, of course, but everyone else will be plenty satisfied

Samsung SCH-i405 Stratosphere specifications:
Dimensions
126 x 65 x 14 mm (4.96 x 2.56 x 0.55 in)
Weight
164 g (5.78 oz)
SIM
Mini-SIM
Display type
Super AMOLED capacitive touchscreen, 16M colors
Display size
4.0 inches (~55.6% screen-to-body ratio)
Display resolution
480 x 800 pixels (~233 ppi pixel density)
OS
Android OS, v2.3 (Gingerbread)
Chipset
----
CPU
1 GHz
GPU
----
Internal memory
4 GB ROM, 512 MB RAM
Camera
5 MP, 2592 х 1944 pixels
Battery
Li-Ion 1800 mAh battery
Samsung SCH-R910 Galaxy Indulge

The screen itself is as smooth and responsive as any other Galaxy phone, for which we can thank the speedy Android 2.2 operating system and the 1GHz Hummingbird processor. Its accelerometer is equally snappy, rotating the interface from portrait to landscape view in less than a second. The standard Android onscreen keyboard is there for flying fingers, but so is Swype, software that lets you trace letters to create words. If that shoe doesn't fit, you can switch between the two virtual keyboards. Like all phones running Froyo, the Indulge supports pinch to zoom.

Below the display are physical buttons for the menu, home screen, back button, and Google search. The buttons are comfortable and fast-acting; they depress with a satisfying, audible click. On the right spine you'll find the camera shutter and a Micro-USB charging port; the volume rocker is on the other side. Up top are the 3.5mm headset jack and the power button. You'll find the 3.2-megapixel camera on the back, and nestled beneath the back cover is the microSD card slot. It can hold up to 32GB of extra storage.

There's more hardware to be had on the Indulge: a slide-out QWERTY keyboard with four rows, one row less than on the even more spacious Epic 4G. The backlit keys feel fairly flat, but they're spaced out and easy to press, with the right amount of resistance. We did have some minor complaints on behalf of those with smaller hands, however. The function button was often awkward to reach in the top left of the keyboard, and the width of the keyboard itself might be a stretch at times. Still, typing was fast and comfortable and most hands should adapt.

Samsung SCH-R910 Galaxy Indulge specifications:
Dimensions
132 x 61 x 15 mm (5.20 x 2.40 x 0.59 in)
Weight
152 g (5.36 oz)
SIM
Mini-SIM
Display type
TFT capacitive touchscreen, 16M colors
Display size
3.5 inches (~45.3% screen-to-body ratio)
Display resolution
320 x 480 pixels (~165 ppi pixel density)
OS
Android OS, v2.2 (Froyo)
Chipset
----
CPU
Samsung Exynos 3110, 1 GHz
GPU
PowerVR SGX540
Internal memory
2 GB ROM
Camera
3.15 MP, 2048 x 1536 pixels
Battery
Li-Ion 1500 mAh battery
Samsung SGH-i927 Captivate Glide

Touchscreen keyboards have come a long, long way and, when paired with an appropriately sized display, remove the majority of frustration and misspellings that are now considered par for the mobile course. If, however, you still cling to the notion that physical feedback is superior to capacitive tech, then the Captivate Glide's for you. Unlike the flimsy hinges used on T-Mobile's G2 or the stiff mechanism employed by the Droid 3, this keypad snaps out smoothly and securely. It is slightly difficult to get a handle on the device while you attempt to slide it open and there were more than a few instances when it almost flew out of our hands given its relative lightness and the force of the slider.

Samsung's spread out the QWERTY fun over four rows, so there's a sense of spaciousness to the keyboard where other efforts come off as cluttered. Except for the oblong menu, home, back and search buttons bordering the layout, the rest of the keys are rounded squares that lie virtually flush with the pad. You'll have to rely on muscle memory to punch out those texts and emails or just keep a fixed eye on your thumb placement, considering the lack of any raised surface or texture to guide you, save for the slight notches on the F and J keys. The keys are backlit, however, so typing at night won't pose much of an issue, nor will using the keyboard while lying prostrate thanks to the equal weight distribution between the screen and slide out pad.

Much as you'd expect, popping open the keypad automatically reorients the screen into landscape mode, giving you the option to touch to navigate or use the provided physical buttons. Pressing any of the letter keys triggers the search function which displays a list of alphabetically relevant contacts and applications selectable via the OK button. It's an unintuitive setup that'll have you opting for a swipe instead of a button push. And speaking of Swype, the application comes pre-loaded onto the device as an alternative input option should you fall out of love with tactile feedback. It is really cool phone from old Samsung times design -- time will go out and Samsung will orient on Apple phones design and lost it's charm

In our time with the Captivate Glide, we found typing on the keypad to be a mixture of fluid and frustrating -- the fault of which lies with the flat layout. Too often, our fingers would slip and depress the wrong key or even no key at all. If Samsung had only added a bit of a curve to the physical keys, the experience would be that much smoother. As it is, you won't be able to focus solely on the screen while you bang out messages and, if you do intend to rely solely on the keyboard, expect a few hiccups.

Samsung SGH-i927 Captivate Glide specifications:
Dimensions
124 x 64 x 13 mm (4.88 x 2.52 x 0.51 in)
Weight
147 g (5.19 oz)
SIM
Mini-SIM
Display type
Super AMOLED capacitive touchscreen, 16M colors
Display size
4.0 inches (~57.4% screen-to-body ratio)
Display resolution
480 x 800 pixels (~233 ppi pixel density)
OS
Android OS, v4.0 (Ice Cream Sandwich)
Chipset
Nvidia Tegra 2 AP20H
CPU
Dual-core 1 GHz Cortex-A9
GPU
ULP GeForce
Internal memory
8 GB, 1 GB RAM, 1 GB ROM
Camera
8 MP, 3264 x 2448 pixels
Battery
Li-Ion 1650 mAh battery
Samsung SPH-M580 Replenish

Say what you will about BlackBerry devices -- its keyboards are still the standard by which any other QWERTY handset strives to live up to. Research in Motion has mastered the skill of making the most out of the limited real estate its devices have to work with, and while there are a few key differences, it's as though Samsung was purposely trying to achieve the same end result. Each individual key is rather small, but an oval-shaped bubble lifts each one up higher. In theory, the bubbled contour of each key is supposed to help you type faster, but our initial typing resulted in smashing our thumbs onto multiple keys at once. We got used to the keyboard after a while and were able to speed our typing up by a little, but typing still felt completely cramped.

The Replenish offers four rows of typing goodness, which inevitably means something had to be left out; in this case it was the dedicated row of numbers on the chopping block, leaving the stranded digits to gather on the left side of the keyboard in the same form as an old-fashioned keypad. If we can't have a dedicated number row, this format is the next best thing. We liked the specialty keys added into the Replenish keyboard: .com and emoticons were offered as Fn options, along with dedicated voice control and @ buttons. Overall, the typing experience was about as good as can be expected on a portrait QWERTY; we're working in tight quarters, but it's still usable.

Samsung SPH-M580 Replenish specifications:
Dimensions
123 x 60 x 11 mm (4.84 x 2.36 x 0.43 in)
Weight
116 g (4.09 oz)
SIM
Mini-SIM
Display type
TFT touchscreen, 256K colors
Display size
2.8 inches (~32.9% screen-to-body ratio)
Display resolution
240 x 320 pixels (~143 ppi pixel density)
OS
Android OS, v2.3 (Gingerbread)
Chipset
Qualcomm MSM7627-2
CPU
600 MHz
GPU
Adreno 200
Internal memory
256 MB RAM, 512 MB ROM
Camera
2 MP, 1600 x 1200 pixels
Battery
Li-Ion 1160 mAh battery
Samsung SCH-R880 Acclaim

As an alternative to the touch screen, the Acclaim also has a square select key that doubles as an optical trackpad underneath the display. It provides a nice way to scroll through Web pages without having to drag your finger across the screen. Surrounding the optical pad are the usual Android hot keys to the pop-up menu, home, back, and search. The controls are laid out in a square rather than the more typical single line. It felt roomier, which led to fewer accidental presses.

When you slide the phone's display to the right, you'll find a full QWERTY keyboard. The sliding mechanism is quite smooth and locks securely into place. The keyboard is spacious enough, but we felt the keys were a bit too flat, with not enough delineation between them. Still, the keys had a decent feel when pushed, and we managed to type out text with few mistakes. The Acclaim also provides an onscreen keyboard if you would rather not use the physical one.

Samsung SCH-R880 Acclaim specifications:
Dimensions
114 x 59 x 15 mm (4.49 x 2.32 x 0.59 in)
Weight
130 g (4.59 oz)
SIM
Mini-SIM
Display type
TFT touchscreen, 256K colors
Display size
3.2 inches (~45.3% screen-to-body ratio)
Display resolution
320 x 480 pixels (~180 ppi pixel density)
OS
Android OS, v2.2 (Froyo)
Chipset
----
CPU
----
GPU
----
Internal memory
256 MB RAM, 512 MB ROM
Camera
3.15 MP, 2048 x 1536 pixels
Battery
Li-Ion 1500 mAh battery
Samsung SPH-D700 Epic 4G

The Epic's slide mechanism is a fairly heavy, smooth spring-mounted arrangement that feels solid with no wobble; on our unit there's just a tiny hint of give on the screen if you actively try to twist it, but we don't notice it in normal day-to-day use. That leads us into the keyboard, which is a completely flat, five-row type with a good deal of separation between the keys. You've got a good, strong "click" on each key -- no mushiness here -- but we definitely would've preferred a bit of doming, and we would've even been happy to sacrifice the separation in exchange for making the surface area of each key larger. The layout is a mixed bag -- we enjoyed having access to big Menu, Back, Home, and Search keys astride the letters, but the placement of Backspace and Enter gave us a little trouble... and we definitely weren't feeling the need for a dedicated smiley face key. Overall, we'd say that the Epic's QWERTY falls behind those of Android contemporaries like the myTouch 3G Slide (manufactured by keyboard specialist HTC, of course) and the Droid 2, but that's not to say that it's bad -- it's leaps and bounds beyond the dismal Moment, for example, and we imagine that anyone would be able to get fast and error-free on it within a couple days of use.

What surprised us the first time we picked up the Epic was how light it felt -- 15 grams less than the EVO, to be exact. Frankly, we wouldn't have minded it being a bit heavier, which leads us to wonder whether they could've squeezed in something beefier than a 1500mAh battery without causing problems. Though the Epic's screen is three-tenths of an inch smaller than the EVO's, the two are surprisingly close in length and width -- in other words, you shouldn't consider this over the EVO simply because you think it's going to be easier to hold. At 14.2mm deep, the Epic is noticeably thicker, but still comfortable in the hand (it's thin enough so that your fingers will likely still arch beyond the back cover) and it doesn't produce a ridiculous bulge in your pocket -- unless you're wearing something skinny and fashionable, of course. Then again, there aren't many smartphones that look good in that situation.

Samsung SPH-D700 Epic 4G specifications:
Dimensions
124 x 65 x 14 mm (4.88 x 2.56 x 0.55 in)
Weight
155 g (5.47 oz)
SIM
Mini-SIM
Display type
Super AMOLED capacitive touchscreen, 16M colors
Display size
4.0 inches (~56.5% screen-to-body ratio)
Display resolution
480 x 800 pixels (~233 ppi pixel density)
OS
Android OS, v2.2 (Froyo)
Chipset
Hummingbird
CPU
1 GHz Cortex-A8
GPU
PowerVR SGX540
Internal memory
512 MB RAM, 512 MB ROM
Camera
5 MP, 2592 x 1944 pixels
Battery
Li-Ion 1500 mAh battery
Samsung SPH-M910 Intercept

The Samsung Intercept has a spacious physical keyboard.

The slide-out QWERTY keyboard is a nice reveal. The buttons are smaller than on the slightly taller Samsung Transform , and angle in. Interestingly, the center buttons are flatter than those on the periphery, which are slightly domed for easier pressing. We liked the placement of the Function key, which was easily accessible. Both landscape and portrait modes give you access to the virtual QWERTY keyboard any time you'd rather keep your fingertips trained on the touch screen, though we found the smallish virtual keyboard less accurate to type on in portrait mode.

Slide the phone's display to the right, and you'll find full four-row QWERTY keyboard. The keyboard is great--it's roomy with keys that are well-spaced apart, and we like that they're sufficiently raised above the surface for quick and easy typing. The arrow keys are highlighted in gray. If you'd rather not use the physical keyboard, you also have the option of the virtual QWERTY keyboard in both landscape and portrait modes.

Samsung SPH-M910 Intercept specifications:
Dimensions
113 x 56 x 15 mm (4.45 x 2.20 x 0.59 in)
Weight
139 g (4.90 oz)
SIM
Mini-SIM
Display type
TFT touchscreen, 65K colors
Display size
3.2 inches (~46.1% screen-to-body ratio)
Display resolution
240 x 400 pixels (~146 ppi pixel density)
OS
Android OS, v2.2 (Froyo)
Chipset
----
CPU
Samsung S3C6410, 800 MHz
GPU
----
Internal memory
256 MB RAM, 512 MB ROM
Camera
3.15 MP, 2048 x 1536 pixels
Battery
Li-Ion 1500 mAh battery
Samsung Galaxy Stratosphere 2

When Verizon and Samsung announced the Stratosphere II (full annoying name is Samsung Galaxy Stratosphere 2) a couple weeks ago, the only clue we got as to availability was the ever-ambiguous "coming soon." Turns out, it's available now. In addition to being listed on Verizon's website ($129 on contract, $449 outright), Android Central reader Steve picked one up at his local Radio Shack for his wife, who "loves it," he writes. "She has to have a keyboard phone so she's thrilled to finally have a new phone."

Steve brings us a pretty good look at the QWERTY smartphone, with its five-row silder keyboard hidden behind the display when not in use.
This five row keyboard has handy search, emoticon, web launcher, and arrow keys. Individual keys are well spaced and have reasonable travel. In the middle of each key, there is a slightly raised bump. A combination of a stiff hinge and slippery back cover make it difficult to slide out the keyboard.

Samsung Galaxy Stratosphere 2 specifications:
Dimensions
126.2 x 65.5 x 13.5 mm (4.97 x 2.58 x 0.53 in)
Weight
154 g (5.43 oz)
SIM
Micro-SIM
Display type
Super AMOLED capacitive touchscreen, 16M colors
Display size
4.0 inches (~55.1% screen-to-body ratio)
Display resolution
480 x 800 pixels (~233 ppi pixel density)
OS
Android OS, v4.0.4 (Ice Cream Sandwich)
Chipset
Qualcomm MSM8960 Snapdragon
CPU
Dual-core 1.2 GHz Krait
GPU
Adreno 225
Internal memory
8 GB ROM, 1 GB RAM
Camera
5 MP, 2592 х 1944 pixels
Battery
Li-Ion 1800 mAh battery
Samsung Galaxy S Relay 4G

The Relay 4G can only be described as a half-hearted attempt at an ergonomically pleasing device.

A hardware keyboard entails some extra heft, but the idea is that you'll enjoy a more comfortable typing experience than cramped touchscreen keyboards can offer. We've seen that concept carried through on sliders like the Photon Q 4G LTE, whose keypad offers well-sized keys and a decent amount of travel. But if that Sprint handset is a success story, the Relay 4G can only be described as a half-hearted attempt at an ergonomically pleasing device.

The Galaxy S Relay 4G's keyboard isn't completely flush with the rest of the deck, but it's not raised enough to let you find keys by feel, either. There's definitely a learning curve with this layout -- and even accomplished touch typists may find themselves looking down at their fingers pretty often. Using a third-party typing test app, we notched shamefully low word-per-minute scores (read: less than 20 words per minute when we stopped to correct our various mistakes). The keys are on the small side, but the real challenge to efficient typing is the flat layout: our fingers often hit adjacent letters or no letter at all. We do appreciate the keyboard backlighting, which, while not adjustable, helps for pecking out messages in low-light conditions.

Sliding the keyboard out feels smooth and secure -- no creakiness here -- but if anything, the mechanism offers too much resistance and requires a hearty push to open up and reveal the keys. That's probably better than an overly sensitive slider that moves at the slightest touch, but we had the distinct sensation that we were mowing over keys row by row when we pushed out the keyboard, as if Samsung didn't leave enough room between the keyboard and the slider mechanism.

Samsung Galaxy S Relay 4G specifications:
Dimensions
126 x 66 x 13.5 mm (4.96 x 2.60 x 0.53 in)
Weight
147 g (5.19 oz)
SIM
Mini-SIM
Display type
Super AMOLED capacitive touchscreen, 16M colors
Display size
4.0 inches (~54.8% screen-to-body ratio)
Display resolution
480 x 800 pixels (~233 ppi pixel density)
OS
Android OS, v4.0 (Ice Cream Sandwich)
Chipset
Qualcomm MSM8960 Snapdragon
CPU
Dual-core 1.5 GHz Krait
GPU
Adreno 225
Internal memory
8 GB ROM, 1 GB RAM
Camera
5 MP, 2592 х 1944 pixels
Battery
Li-Ion 1800 mAh battery
Samsung GT-B5330 Galaxy Chat

We haven't seen too many BlackBerry-style Android phones hit the shelves, so every new model with a portrait QWERTY keyboard gets examined with interest. One new handset of this form-factor is scheduled to come out pretty soon – the Samsung Galaxy Chat.

This is not the first Samsung handset with the “Chat” monicker. However, the first Ch@ts were simple feature phones that were mainly targeted towards teens who text a lot. Now, with the new Galaxy Chat, Samsung is bringing the Chat family to the world of smartphones, where it might become appealing to a significantly larger group of users. Let's see if the cramped front-facing QWERTY keyboard still has a place in this modern landscape!

The small QWERTY keyboard below the screen is awesome. Naturally, the keys are so tiny that you have to press them with your nails, but they make the perfect clicking sound and give wonderful feedback. You won't be a speed-demon with this QWERTY, but pressing the wrong key seems to be a bit more difficult with it, than it is with an on-screen one, thus saving you some frustrating moments.

Samsung GT-B5330 Galaxy Chat specifications:
Dimensions
118.9 x 59.3 x 11.7 mm (4.68 x 2.33 x 0.46 in)
Weight
112 g (3.95 oz)
SIM
Mini-SIM
Display type
TFT capacitive touchscreen, 256K colors
Display size
3.0 inches (~39.5% screen-to-body ratio)
Display resolution
240 x 320 pixels (~133 ppi pixel density)
OS
Android OS, v4.1.2 (Jelly Bean)
Chipset
850 MHz
CPU
----
GPU
----
Internal memory
512 MB RAM, 4GB ROM
Camera
2 MP, 1600 x 1200 pixels
Battery
Li-Ion 1200 mAh battery
Sharp AQUOS Phone IS-11H

Instead of the QWERTY keyboards we’re so acclimated to seeing, the AQUOS Buzz IS11H has a acceptable old ancient after keypad, some action buttons and what appears to be a 4-way directional key.Looking like a affection buzz after getting one, the AQUOS Buzz IS11H packs a able 1.4GHz MSM8655 Snapdragon processor. It aswell appearance 1.2GB of centralized storage, a 3.7″ (960 x 540) touchscreen that supports glasses-free 3D, Android 2.3 (Gingerbread), and an 8megapixel camera able of cutting 3D pictures and video. It aswell comes with the accepted Bluetooth, WiFi, GPS, and a 1Seg TV Tuner.No chat on appraisement or absolution date, but we’ll apparently never get to see the accessory on auction in this allotment of the world.

Sharp AQUOS Phone IS-11H specifications:
Dimensions
----
Weight
----
SIM
----
Display type
TFT capacitive touchscreen, 256K colors
Display size
3.7 inches
Display resolution
540 x 960 pixels
OS
Android OS, v2.3 (Gingerbread)
Chipset
Qualcomm Snapdragon S2 MSM8655
CPU
1400 MHz
GPU
Adreno 205
Internal memory
----
Camera
8 MP
Battery
----
Sony Ericsson Xperia mini pro

We've already briefly touched upon the gallery app earlier and there really isn't much else to talk about it -- it just works. As for the video player, the only caveat is that it doesn't play 720p and above video clips, so make sure you have the right settings when converting MP4 clips to watch on the go. In fact, now that to think of it, PlayNow would be pretty awesome if it also offers video downloads. Anyway, let's move on to Timescape: as featured on the X10, this app is pretty much SE's take on HTC's FriendStream, letting you stalk your friends and strangers from Twitter, Facebook and text messages in the style of a vertical timeline. You can also link up your Twitter and Facebook contacts with your Google contacts through Timescape, but for some reason you can't do the same in the address book -- in that sense (no pun intended), HTC does a better job at social networking service integration.

Worried about typing on the X10 Mini's numpad-style virtual keyboard? It actually wasn't too bad for us, which says a lot since we're accustomed to other smartphones' QWERTY keyboards. Text prediction on both phones worked well most of the time, and we could also easily add customized words on the spot; if you prefer, you can quickly switch to the old-fashioned multitap input. Still, we'd favor the Mini Pro's physical QWERTY keyboard for speedier typing, even if it means we'd be carrying a slightly heavier package -- a hefty 1.1 ounces extra. Regardless of the input type, though, we did spot a common bug: while minding our usual Twitter business in Twicca, we noticed that the text cursor -- also a unique SE feature -- could only travel back by a certain number of characters, meaning we couldn't fix any previous typos. Hopefully this would be a quick fix for SE.

Sony Ericsson Xperia mini pro specifications:
Dimensions
92 x 53 x 18 mm (3.62 x 2.09 x 0.71 in)
Weight
136 g (4.80 oz)
SIM
Mini-SIM
Display type
LED-backlit LCD, capacitive touchscreen, 16M colors
Display size
3.0 inches (~55.0% screen-to-body ratio)
Display resolution
320 x 480 pixels (~192 ppi pixel density)
OS
Android OS, v4.0 (Ice Cream Sandwich)
Chipset
Qualcomm MSM8255 Snapdragon
CPU
1 GHz Scorpion
GPU
Adreno 205
Internal memory
512 MB RAM, 400 MB ROM
Camera
5 MP, 2592 х 1944 pixels
Battery
Li-Ion 1200 mAh battery
Sony Ericsson Xperia X10 Mini Pro

The Xperia X10 Mini Pro's QWERTY keyboard adds extra weight to the phone, giving us a handset that feels much heavier than the slightly lightweight X10 Mini, which somehow tricks the brain into thinking it's a more solid, high quality device. It's lovely in the hand. People will pass it around in admiration.

The keyboard flips out with a heavy clunk and is backlit, with light twinkling out through its keys to guide your thumbs when the automatic sensor thinks it's dark enough for you to need a bit of help finding the right buttons.

The keyboard is solid, doesn't bend or flex, and while it's obviously a little cramped given the minuscule nature of the phone itself, there's enough of a gap between the slightly raised buttons to ensure typing is possible to a good degree of accuracy.

Sony Ericsson Xperia X10 Mini Pro specifications:
Dimensions
90 x 52 x 17 mm (3.54 x 2.05 x 0.67 in)
Weight
120 g (4.23 oz)
SIM
Mini-SIM
Display type
TFT capacitive touchscreen, 16M colors (65K effective)
Display size
2.55 inches (~43.0% screen-to-body ratio)
Display resolution
240 x 320 pixels (~157 ppi pixel density)
OS
Android OS, v2.1 (Eclair)
Chipset
Qualcomm MSM7227 Snapdragon
CPU
600 MHz ARM 11
GPU
Adreno 200
Internal memory
128 MB
Camera
5 MP, 2592 х 1944 pixels
Battery
Li-Po 930 mAh battery
T-Mobile myTouch 4G Slide

The myTouch 4G Slide is as pleasant to handle as it is to look at. It's a solid, well-made device with a heft that inspires confidence despite the extensive use of plastics. Both the weight (184g / 6.5oz) and thickness (13.2mm / 0.52in) are on par with other sliders (HTC's G2 comes to mind). Still, it can feel somewhat bulky if you're accustomed to slates like the myTouch 4G. Pop the back cover and you're greeted by a 1520mAh battery that's also compatible with the Sensation, SIM slot, and microSD card reader (an 8GB card is supplied). There's an interesting design touch here: the camera is mounted in a machined aluminum cylinder which is partially anodized in a beautiful shade of apple green. Sadly this is most obvious when the battery door is removed, and will likely go unnoticed by the casual observer.

Sliding the handset open reveals a staggered four-row QWERTY keyboard with black keys on a silver faux-aluminum background. While the mechanism (which is not spring loaded) is adequately smooth and sturdy, the keys themselves feel mushy compared to the myTouch 3G Slide. We'd have preferred keys with better defined tactile feedback. The other problem is the backlight, which only turns on when it's pitch dark, making it difficult to read the keys in low light. In practice, we ended up using the onscreen virtual keyboard (we installed SwiftKey X) more often than the physical QWERTY keyboard. So if you're considering the Slide for its keyboard, try before you buy -- you've been warned.

T-Mobile myTouch 4G Slide specifications:
Dimensions
122 x 66 x 14 mm (4.80 x 2.60 x 0.55 in)
Weight
184 g (6.49 oz)
SIM
Mini-SIM
Display type
S-LCD capacitive touchscreen, 16M colors
Display size
3.7 inches (~48.4% screen-to-body ratio)
Display resolution
480 x 800 pixels (~252 ppi pixel density)
OS
Android OS, v2.3.4 (Gingerbread)
Chipset
----
CPU
Dual-core 1.2 GHz Scorpion
GPU
Adreno 220
Internal memory
4 GB ROM, 768 MB RAM
Camera
8 MP, 3264 x 2448 pixels
Battery
Li-Ion 1520 mAh battery
T-Mobile Sidekick 4G/Samsung SGH-T839

The Sidekick 4G's QWERTY keyboard is outstanding and very easy to use.

Once open, you have access to the five-row QWERTY keyboard, and as we've come to expect from Sidekicks, the keyboard is excellent. There's ample spacing between the bulbous buttons and they provide a nice tactile feedback, so we were able to type quickly and with very few mistakes. We also appreciate the presence of the number row and dedicated keys for emoticons, the @ symbol, and voice commands. You can also create shortcuts using the combination of the jump key and a letter. Some are already preset--for example, pressing the jump key and the M key will launch the music player--but you're free to create more. If you don't need to write a long message, the Sidekick 4G also offers the Swype virtual keyboard.

T-Mobile Sidekick 4G/Samsung SGH-T839 specifications:
Dimensions
127 x 61 x 15 mm (5.0 x 2.40 x 0.59 in)
Weight
162 g (5.71 oz)
SIM
Mini-SIM
Display type
TFT capacitive touchscreen, 16M colors
Display size
3.5 inches (~45.0% screen-to-body ratio)
Display resolution
480 x 800 pixels (~267 ppi pixel density)
OS
Android OS, v2.2 (Froyo)
Chipset
Hummingbird
CPU
1 GHz Cortex-A8
GPU
PowerVR SGX540
Internal memory
1 GB ROM, 512 MB RAM
Camera
3.15 MP, 2048 x 1536 pixels
Battery
Li-Ion 1500 mAh battery
ZTE Tureis

On first glance, you'd be excused for thinking you were picking up a BlackBerry. Made of black plastic with a soft-touch rear, ZTE has produced a well-built piece of kit that’s very tactile with no squeaks or groans. Sporting a four-row QWERTY keyboard with the usual row of shortcut keys either side of the D-pad, the Tureis looks audaciously similar to one of RIM's Curve or Bold handsets. It's only once you push the power button on the top edge of the chassis that you're welcomed by a familiar looking droid. Elsewhere on the handset you have a volume rocker on the left side, a Micro USB data and charging port on the right, a 3.5mm headphone jack on top next to the power button and a camera lens and loudspeaker on the back.

If you like your handsets with physical keyboards, this is one of the better ones. The keys are nicely profiled and spaced enough to ensure that you won't be wearing out the backspace correcting your mistakes. There's a reassuring click and bounce-back to the keys and the sharing between letters and symbols seems amicable enough. As we mentioned, the Tureis runs on the Android platform, specifically the Gingerbread-flavoured 2.3 version, which is as up to date as you can hope for on a budget smartphone. As such, the hard keys either side of the D-pad are the familiar Home, Menu, Search and Back buttons, with the unusual addition (for an Android) of Call Answer and End keys.

ZTE Tureis specifications:
Dimensions
63.2 x 112 x 11.8 mm
Weight
126 g
SIM
Mini-SIM
Display type
TFT capacitive touchscreen, 256K colors
Display size
2.6 inches
Display resolution
240 x 320 pixels
OS
Android OS, v2.3 (Gingerbread)
Chipset
----
CPU
Qualcomm Snapdragon S1 MSM7227T, 800 MHz
GPU
----
Internal memory
512 MB ROM, 512 MB RAM
Camera
3.2 MP, 2048 x 1536 pixels
Battery
Li-Ion 1100 mAh battery
Kyocera Rise

Underneath is a four-row QWERTY sliding keyboard. The snapping mechanism is sturdy, and the keys sport a unique and modern typeface that I really dig. The buttons are generously sized and spaced, but because they aren't very bulbous, someone with bigger hands may find it difficult to type. I, however, had no trouble typing out messages, and I found the four navigational keys on the right to be useful.

Though it's always refreshing to see Android 4.0 run on a midlevel handset, not every Ice Cream Sandwich flavor is irresistible. While I did appreciate the Kyocera Rise's call quality and low price, outside of the relatively new OS, this device doesn't have much to offer. Unlike its wet and wild counterpart, the Kyocera Rise doesn't have the novelty of being waterproof going for it. Instead, it has a keyboard that, while attractively designed, doesn't give it enough of an edge to make its midrange specs and hefty design exciting.

Kyocera Rise specifications:
Dimensions
113 x 60.5 x 14.3 mm (4.45 x 2.38 x 0.56 in)
Weight
158 g (5.57 oz)
SIM
Mini-SIM
Display type
IPS LCD capacitive touchscreen
Display size
3.5 inches (~53.4% screen-to-body ratio)
Display resolution
320 x 480 pixels (~165 ppi pixel density)
OS
Android OS, v4.0 (Ice Cream Sandwich)
Chipset
Qualcomm MSM8655 Snapdragon
CPU
1 GHz
GPU
Adreno 205
Internal memory
2 GB ROM, 512 MB RAM
Camera
3.15 MP, 2048 x 1536 pixels
Battery
Li-Ion 1500 mAh battery
BlackBerry Priv

The Priv stands tall above BlackBerry's last three efforts. The Passport had a great keyboard and access to some Android apps via the Amazon app store, but its wide body was cumbersome. The Classic, an updated homage to a formula that had worked so well in the past, had a four-row keyboard that stole valuable screen real estate. The all-touch Leap gave us a 5-inch display, but a low, 720p resolution, quaint design, and that paltry supply of apps kept it behind the modern smartphone pack.

The Priv fixes these flaws, taking the best parts of each device and dropping the whole package onto a popular mobile operating system. I should be thrilled. Why am I not thrilled? It's that keyboard. The Priv's keyboard is the star of the show, but it's too late for physical keyboards.

Oh, I hear you in the back, clutching your BlackBerry Bold (or maybe your Torch 9800 ), and scoffing at the world of touch-screen keyboards. It's not so bad! Fantastic apps like Swype and Swiftkey make hammering out text on the screen as easy as doodling. And if you'd rather not grab a third party app, spacious screens on modern smartphones are far easier to type on -- just let autocorrect take the wheel, and give your message a second look if you're worried about typos.

But if you must hold onto that physical keyboard at least ditch that relic. The Priv is the phone BlackBerry fans have been waiting for. You'll get BlackBerry's security pedigree and that physical keyboard you love, paired with a spacious, beautiful screen, and access to all those Android apps people are always yammering about. If you're an Android fan who's curious about physical keyboards and don't care about the BlackBerry pedigree, you'd do well to take a look too.

What's left for the rest of us? A pretty good Android phone that's a little thicker than rest, with a keyboard you'll rarely use and some productivity features that are likely handled by apps you're already using. The Priv will not fail to turn heads, with a slick design, fast performance, and a dedication to security that'll make plenty of folks take notice. But when your competitors are offering sophisticated camera controls, like the LG V10 , fingerprint scanners like the Nexus 5X and the Nexus 6P , or a curved display that's a bit more useful, like the Samsung Galaxy S6 Edge+ , you're going to need more than that niche keyboard appeal to pull ahead of the pack.

BlackBerry Priv specifications:
Dimensions
147 x 77.2 x 9.4 mm (5.79 x 3.04 x 0.37 in)
Weight
192 g (6.77 oz)
SIM
Nano-SIM
Display type
AMOLED capacitive touchscreen, 16M colors
Display size
5.4 inches (~71.9% screen-to-body ratio)
Display resolution
1440 x 2560 pixels (~540 ppi pixel density)
OS
Android OS, v6.0 (Marshmallow)
Chipset
Qualcomm MSM8992 Snapdragon 808
CPU
Dual-core 1.8 GHz Cortex-A57
GPU
Adreno 418
Internal memory
32 GB, 3 GB RAM
Camera
18 MP, f/2.2, 27mm, Schneider-Kreuznach optics
Battery
Non-removable Li-Ion 3410 mAh battery
Give me some rating stars: 
5
Average: 5 (1 vote)
Acer beTouch E210,Acer beTouch E130,Alcatel OT-916,Alcatel OT-910,Alcatel OT-980,Highscreen Zeus,HTC ChaCha,HTC EVO Shift 4G,c,HTC Desire Z,HTC Dream (T-Mobile G1),Huawei U8300,Motorola ADMIRAL,Motorola CLIQ 2,Motorola DROID 3,Motorola FIRE (Motorola SPICE Key),Motorola Milestone 3,Motorola PRO+,Motorola SPICE,Motorola TITANIUM,Motorola XPRT,Motorola CHARM,Motorola Devour,Motorola Droid 2,Motorola DROID PRO,Motorola Flipout,Motorola FLIPSIDE,Motorola Droid 4,Motorola Photon Q 4G LTE,Kyocera Milano,LG Rumor Reflex,LG Enlighten,LG Optimus Chat,LG Optimus Pro C660,LG Optimus Q2,LG Ally,LG Optimus F3Q,LG Mach,LG Enact,Huawei U8350, Huawei Boulder,Samsung GT-B5512 Galaxy Y Pro Duos,Samsung GT-B7800 Galaxy M Pro,Samsung GT-B5510 Galaxy Y Pro,Samsung GT-B7510 Galaxy Pro,Samsung SCH-i405 Stratosphere,Samsung SCH-R910 Galaxy Indulge,Samsung SGH-i927 Captivate Glide,Samsung SPH-M580 Replenish,Samsung SCH-R880 Acclaim,Samsung SPH-D700 Epic 4G,android,qwerty,keypad,phone
true

English

John
John
Merelinc
24.07.1987
male
Frontend developer

http://merelinc.com/images/036-android-phones-with-qwerty-keyboard/preview.jpg
62 QWERTY Android phones: amazing buttons
http://merelinc.com/images/036-android-phones-with-qwerty-keyboard/preview.jpg
Are you looking for an Android phone with a physical QWERTY keypad? In my review you can find almost all qwerty-keyboard devices under different Android versions control. Some of them are sexy, some of them -- funny, some of them -- inspiring, but all of them are unique and unrepeatable.
62 QWERTY Android phones: amazing buttons!
article
Big collection of 62 qwerty android phones

62 QWERTY Android phones: amazing buttons

Are you looking for an Android phone with a physical QWERTY keypad? In my review you can find almost all qwerty-keyboard devices under different Android versions control. Some of them are sexy, some of them -- funny, some of them -- inspiring, but all of them are unique and unrepeatable.

980

John
John
Merelinc
24.07.1987
male
Frontend developer

2016

John
John
Merelinc
24.07.1987
male
Frontend developer

27-05-2016

John
John
Merelinc
24.07.1987
male
Frontend developer

62 QWERTY Android phones: amazing buttons!

Are you looking for an Android phone with a physical QWERTY keypad? In my review you can find almost all qwerty-keyboard devices under different Android versions control. Some of them are sexy, some of them -- funny, some of them -- inspiring, but all of them are unique and unrepeatable.

62 QWERTY Android phones: amazing buttons!

Are you looking for an Android phone with a physical QWERTY keypad? In my review you can find almost all qwerty-keyboard devices under different Android versions control. Some of them are sexy, some of them -- funny, some of them -- inspiring, but all of them are unique and unrepeatable.

John
John
Merelinc
24.07.1987
male
Frontend developer
John
John
Merelinc
24.07.1987
male
Frontend developer

English
1790
62 QWERTY Android phones: amazing buttons!
2016



article
62 QWERTY Android phones: amazing buttons!
true
Acer beTouch E210,Acer beTouch E130,Alcatel OT-916,Alcatel OT-910,Alcatel OT-980,Highscreen Zeus,HTC ChaCha,HTC EVO Shift 4G,c,HTC Desire Z,HTC Dream (T-Mobile G1),Huawei U8300,Motorola ADMIRAL,Motorola CLIQ 2,Motorola DROID 3,Motorola FIRE (Motorola SPICE Key),Motorola Milestone 3,Motorola PRO+,Motorola SPICE,Motorola TITANIUM,Motorola XPRT,Motorola CHARM,Motorola Devour,Motorola Droid 2,Motorola DROID PRO,Motorola Flipout,Motorola FLIPSIDE,Motorola Droid 4,Motorola Photon Q 4G LTE,Kyocera Milano,LG Rumor Reflex,LG Enlighten,LG Optimus Chat,LG Optimus Pro C660,LG Optimus Q2,LG Ally,LG Optimus F3Q,LG Mach,LG Enact,Huawei U8350, Huawei Boulder,Samsung GT-B5512 Galaxy Y Pro Duos,Samsung GT-B7800 Galaxy M Pro,Samsung GT-B5510 Galaxy Y Pro,Samsung GT-B7510 Galaxy Pro,Samsung SCH-i405 Stratosphere,Samsung SCH-R910 Galaxy Indulge,Samsung SGH-i927 Captivate Glide,Samsung SPH-M580 Replenish,Samsung SCH-R880 Acclaim,Samsung SPH-D700 Epic 4G,android,qwerty,keypad,phone

Are you looking for an Android phone with a physical QWERTY keypad? In my review you can find almost all qwerty-keyboard devices under different Android versions control. Some of them are sexy, some of them -- funny, some of them -- inspiring, but all of them are unique and unrepeatable.

62 QWERTY Android phones: amazing buttons!