Nokia phones story: from brick to hi-end

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I think everybody has had more than one Nokia phone. It is like nostalgia: N-Gage QD, 1101, 3230, 7280... Today everybody has a multifunctional device, but we still can remember a time, when Nokia phones were real hi-end or stylish devices. Legendary company has a lot of legendary cheap and expensive phones. So, let's see on some of them. If you won't find your past Nokia phone in the list - write me a short e-mail and you will see missed device soon.

Nokia is a Finnish multinational communications and information technology company. Headquartered in Espoo, Uusimaa, in the greater Helsinki metropolitan area, As of 2013, Nokia employed 90,000 people across 120 countries, conducts sales in more than 150 countries and reported annual revenues of around €12.7 billion. Nokia is a public limited-liability company listed on the Helsinki Stock Exchange and New York Stock Exchange. It is the world's 274th-largest company measured by 2013 revenues according to the Fortune Global 500.

The company currently focuses on large-scale telecommunications infrastructures, technology development and licensing, and online mapping services. Nokia was also a significant contributor to the mobile telephony industry, having assisted in development of the GSM standards, and was, for a period, the largest vendor of mobile phones in the world. Nokia's dominance also extended into the smartphone industry through its Symbian platform, but it was soon overshadowed by the growing dominance of Apple's iPhone line and Android devices. Nokia eventually entered into a pact with Microsoft in 2011 to exclusively use its Windows Phone platform on future smartphones.

In September 2013, Microsoft announced that it would acquire Nokia's mobile phone business as part of an overall deal totaling €5.44 billion (US$7.17 billion). Stephen Elop, Nokia's former CEO, and several other executives joined the new Microsoft Mobile subsidiary of Microsoft as part of the deal, which was completed on 25 April 2014.

In November 2014, following the Microsoft sale, Nokia announced plans to license product designs and technologies to third-party manufacturers, primarily to enable a continued presence for the Nokia brand in the consumer market.

Nokia Mobira Talkman 450 (1984)

This phone was used IN large amounts in all Nordic countries. The Nokia Mobira Talkman450 phones can also be found in the Czech Republic, Holland and Hungary. You cannot play games, download ringtones or browse the web with this phone.And it´s virus protected without any software.

The Talkman IS FOR making phone calls and talking! Ithink it didn´t have any games or wallpapers. It had one ringrone though! I know a guy who always had this phone in his backpack - it was the first real mobile phone.

Nokia Mobira Cityman 900(1987)

The Mobira Cityman 900 was released in 1987 by Nokia-Mobira. It was one of the first compact phones, when compared to earlier models. The nickname of the phone in Finland was "Gorba". This was because the president of the Soviet Union Mikhail Gorbachev used a Cityman 900 (presented to him) to call Moscow during a press conference in October 1987.

The Nokia Cityman was Nokia's first hand held mobile phone. The Motorola 8000X might have been the first mobile phone, but the Nokia or Mobira Cityman was definitely the most stylish cell phone of the 80s. Nokia, from Finland, brought a Scandinavian love of design to the mobile phone industry. The Nokia Cityman became a desirable accessory.
The Nokia company originally made pulp, rope cable and rubber. The branch into mobile communications began in the 70s. Nokia formed a joint venture with Salora Oy to form Mobira. The original Nokia phones were branded Mobira.

Nokia's first ever mobile phone was the Mobira Senator which was made from the Nordic Mobile Telephony (NMT) system as early as 1982. The Nordic countries were well in advance of the UK in the development of mobile phone technology. The Mobira Cityman 900 was the first handheld mobile phone developed for the NMT system.

It was the Nokia Cityman that established Nokia's reputation for high quality, well designed and highly desirable mobile phones. The original Nokia Cityman was manufactured in three guises: Mobira Cityman 450 NMT-450, Mobira Cityman 900 NMT-900, Nokia Cityman 1320 TACS, Nokia Cityman 1320.

The first two were designed for the Nordic Mobile Telephony system, NMT. There were two frequencies by 1987: 450MHz and 900MHz. The Nokia Cityman 1320, which was also marketed as the Mobira Cityman 1320, was developed for the TACS system used in the UK and other European countries.The Mobira Cityman 450 and 900 had a different shaped buttons to the 1320 and different text on the buttons.

What distinguished the Nokia Cityman from its competitors was the design. Smaller and lighter than the Motorola 8000 series, the Nokia Cityman was packaged in a neat functional box in dark matt grey. In the 80s this style signalled high tech seriousness; think about other high end electronics such as hifi or cameras from that era. The Nokia Cityman was also known as the Mobira Cityman. I have seen phones branded with both names. By 1988 Nokia had 13.5% of the world's cellular phone market and 10% of the UK market. For a relatively unknown Finnish company these results were amazing.

Nokia 1011 (1993)

The Nokia 1011 was the first mass-produced GSM phone. It was sold also as Mobira Cityman 2000. The typenumber refers to the launch date, 10 November, in 1992.

The black handset measured 195 x 60 x 45mm and featured a monochrome LCD display and an extendable antenna. The memory could hold 99 phone numbers. It did not yet employ Nokia's characteristic ringtone: that was only introduced in 1994. The phone operated in the 900 MHz band; existing units still function on GSM 900 networks. At that time the device cost about 2500 DM (€1278.22, not accounting for inflation).

The phone was able to send and receive SMS messages, even if Nokia says that its model 2110 phone was the first SMS-enabled GSM phone.

The Nokia 1011 continued production until 1994, when the Nokia 2110 was introduced as a successor.

Nokia 232 (1994)

Mobile phones and teenagers were already making a connection, at least in the USA, in 1995. Alicia Silverstone played Cher in the film Clueless, a comedy drama about the ups and downs of high school life in Beverly Hills. Her phone was the Nokia 232, giving Nokia a second celebrity endorsement and a rather different image from that of Mikhail Gorbachev, former President of the Soviet Union, who was seen using the Nokia Cityman 1320 in 1989.

Frank Nuovo designed the 232 for Nokia. He designed the 232 to be futuristic, but nevertheless true to Nokia's tradition of form follows function. In 1995 Nuovo joined Nokia permanently and spent his time between the USA and Finland.

The 232 was a neat, small design for style conscious customers. Technically the Nokia 232 was also impressive, with 16 hours of standby time and a 98 number memory when Nokia launched it 1994. It was a consumer product rather than a business phone.

Nuovo called the 232 the Ferrari of phones. It had plenty of external recognition as well. The UK's 'What Cellphone' magazine was impressed by the Nokia 232. It won the 'What Cellphone Best Consumer Phone' award for 1994. 'What Cellphone' recognised its sharp style. The 232 also took the Design Award for 1995 and the magazine still recommended it in 1997.

The 232 was launched in several countries. It had a strong following in the USA. Nokia introduced a range of exciting colour options for the US market, including tortoise shell, raging red, indigo blue, black ash, silver stone and green slate. Matt Wisk, Nokia's Marketing Director explained that people chose a tie, a scarf or a watch to match their personality, clothes or car, now they could do the same with a mobile phone.

The Nokia 232 had a recommended retail price of £49.99. However, you could purchase one from Cellphones Direct in 1996 for £24.99, including free connection to Vodafone LowCall, Vodafone's analogue consumer package and The Link offered the same phone on Cellnet for £19.99.

The 232 developed a strong following and like other Nokia products, a reputation for robustness. There was a loyal band of customers with a great affection for the Nokia 232, which in its long production run was available in several colours, as well as a burr walnut finish. There are website reviews praising it as late as 2000.

Nokia 8110 (1996)

The Nokia 8110 re-defined what a mobile phone should look like. It was smaller and lighter than other Nokia phones, but the curved profile, which gave it the nickname, 'the banana' and sliding mouth piece gave the Nokia 8110 its unique appeal. The design reflected the way people used a phone. Like other Scandinavian design it was in harmony with the user.

Answering a call was easy with the Nokia 8110, you just opened the slider to accept the call and closed it to end the call. You could adjust the slider to so that the mouth piece was in exactly the right position for your mouth.

The organic shape caused some controversy in Finland. The two leading Finnish mobile phone retailers, Tele Assa and Tele Porssi, combined to fund an advertising campaign featuring two naked men each holding a Nokia 8110; one held the phone close to his genitals. The tag line translated as 'spot the male manhood'. Nokia distanced itself from these ads and asked the retailer to withdraw them.

Today the 8110's main claim to fame is its role in the Sci-Fi film, The Matrix. The ones used on The Matrix were modified to make using them more slick and futuristic. They had a spring loaded, push button operated slider. This inspired Nokia to add a spring loaded slider to the later 7110 model. The 7110 is often incorrectly called the 'Matrix' phone.

The Nokia 8110 became one of the most desirable handsets available and it replaced the already excellent Nokia 2110 as Nokia's flagship model. 'What Cellphone' gave it the 'Best GSM Phone' award for 1996/7. Although it did not quite beat the Motorola StarTAC for out and out kudos, it was a close run thing, and the Nokia was significantly cheaper.

Nokia 9000 Communicator (1996)

The Nokia 9000 Communicator, released in 1996, was the first product in Nokia’s Communicator series, and was the predecessor to modern smartphones. In essence, the Nokia 9000 Communicator was the first smartphone, with features that included fax, short message texting, wireless imaging, digital camera connectivity, web browser, calendar, calculator, clock and more.

The Nokia 9000 was bulky, weighing 14 ounces; most modern mobile phones weigh less than 5 ounces. The Communicator is largely driven by an Intel 24 MHz i386 CPU. It had 8 MB of memory, divided between 3 areas: 4MB for applications, 2MB for program memory, and 2MB for user data. Its operating system was GEOS 3.0.

The Nokia 9000 Communicator was seen in the 1997 remake of The Saint, used by Val Kilmer’s character: Simon Templar. The 9000 was also used by Anthony Hopkins and Chris Rock in the 2002 action comedy Bad Company.

Nokia 3110 (1997)

The 3110 was a GSM mobile phone handset manufactured by Nokia in Hungary and released for sale in 1997. The 3110 is notable as the first Nokia handset to feature the 'Navi-Key' (AKA D-Pad) menu navigation system. The Navi-Key was featured heavily on Nokia handsets, especially the entry-level models such as the Nokia 1100 in the following years. Unlike its successor, the 3210, and subsequent handsets of similar design, the 3110 had an external antenna. The phone was available with a slim, standard or vibrating battery. It could only be used on a GSM-900 network.

The 3110 shared the platform and accessories of the Nokia 8110 "banana phone".

The model number was reused by Nokia in 2007 when the company launched the Nokia 3110 classic. The 3110 Classic sports a candybar form factor similar to that of the 3110, but adds modern features such as Bluetooth, camera functionality, audio and video playback and recording, and packet data over EDGE, in addition to tri-band functionality.

Unlike subsequent 3000 series mobile phones, its display is not PCD8544 based.

Nokia 5110 (1998)

The consumer oriented 5110 shared the same platform as the Nokia 6110 targeted at the business market. It had the revamped user interface introduced with the 6110 (though slightly made simpler) and lacked the infra-red port.

Although considered bulky by today's ultra-slim standards, the Nokia 5110 (also known as the Nokia 5146 on One2One (now T-Mobile), or nk402 on Orange in the UK) was rugged, had excellent battery life and was one of the first phones to feature the game Snake. It performed all the basic mobile phone functions well. It was also one of the first phones with a replaceable faceplate, allowing users to customize their mobile. It became one of the most popular phones of its age. The Nokia 5110 was discontinued in 2001, replaced by other slimmer, more compact mobiles.

In the Asia Pacific region, Nokia launched a successor to the 5110, the 5110i. The 5110i has a longer talktime and standby time and has a more ergonomic, redesigned, silicone keypad.

While the Nokia 5110 operates only on 900MHz GSM networks, the 5130 operates on 1800MHz GSM networks instead, and was marketed by Orange in the UK as the nk402.

The North American Variant of this handset is the Nokia 5190 which is a 1900 MHz only GSM handset. There was also a North American version of the 5110i, the 5125. The Nokia 5160/Nokia 5165 with TDMA/IS-136 service on 800 MHz and 1900 MHz and analog AMPS service at 800 MHz is the same handset form. The Nokia 5120/5125 is a TDMA/IS-136 handset that operates on 800 MHz and also on AMPS at 800 MHz.

The Nokia 5180i/Nokia 5185i are CDMA/AMPS handsets

Nokia 3210 (1999)

Nokia's new 3210 is undoubtedly one of the most popular handsets with retailers at the moment. It's not one of the lightest phones around, weighing in at 150g, but it does have an impressive feature set for its £50 price.
For a start it has removable covers on both front and back, and Predictive Text Input for SMS (Short Messaging Service) entry. This means that you don't always have to cycle through the letters on each key to get the one you want, as the 3210 will intelligently guess which one you want.

Other value-adding features are a calculator and currency exchange, clock and alarm, selectable ringer/alert profiles, ring tone composer, 40 ringing tones, three games, up to 250 names in the phone book, various timers for call accounting, and many more. A picture messaging service is one of the SMS features, and allows you to send fun graphics to other 3210 users.

The 3210 has an internal antenna, making it sleeker than other phones, and it features EFR (Enhanced Full Rate) technology for better sound quality. Its display dynamically adjusts layout for best viewing, including features like full graphics and variable font size. Nokia claims an excellent standby time of five days, and a talk time of three hours from the included which is also impressive.

A mains charger is included which can rapid-charge the handset in just two and a half hours. Being a dual-band phone, you can receive service in 88 countries around the globe.

One feature the phone doesn't have is a silent vibrate mode, although it does have other discrete modes including a flashing message on the screen - not much use unless you're constantly looking at the phone. Mostly, the menus were easy to navigate and use with Nokia's usual four-button interface, but some of the options weren't well explained on screen.

Overall, we thought the 3210 was quite a good-looking phone and comfortable to use. And with the Xpress-on covers, your phone can be as individual as you are.

Nokia 8850 (1999)

Nokia 8850 is announced in 1999. Although it measures a distinctly petite 100 x 44 x 17 mm, and weighs 91 g, the Nokia 8850 looks nice than it is thanks to the sliding design it adopts.The black and white display is ideal for text, messages and simple pictures like logos and picture massages.The display resolution 96 x 48 pixel is not very high but is normal for low class phone.

The left side of the unit holds a spacious volume rocker. Lacking LEDs of any kind, however, the display - combined with vibration and audible alerts - is the 8850's only way of notifying users of new messages and missed calls. This is common for all Nokia handsets, requiring users to inconveniently have to pick up and activate the device to see whether any alerts are waiting rather than just glance at it.

The 8850 lies well in ones hand.Sporting a simple and user friendly menu in style with other recent Nokia handsets.The plastic keypad has good placed keys, with the shrunken center keys for no apparent reason, make the phone harder to dial than necessary.And last,but not least, a simple two-way navigation buttons centered below the display.

Dual band 900/1800 MHz connectivity isn't all the Nokia 8850 has to offer: there's also support for SMS, .infrared old wireless device,and spacious phone book. Audio quality on the 8850 was crystal clear, and signal quality was good. The removable 650 mAh Li-ion battery is rated for 3.2 hours talk time or 120 hours standby, which is quite low given the battery's theoretical capacity. Charge time is about 97 minutes.

The Nokia 8850 is now available throughout Europe in some language version. Nokia 8850 is a beautiful phone to hold and use, and it's quickly won our hearts. The typical Nokia design flair is present in abundance, with all the requisite consumer features to back it up.But love doesn't notice such little flaws.

Nokia 3310 (2000)

Nokia 3310 is announced in 2000. Nokia's 3310 - one of few models from Nokia featuring a more traditional candy bar design, the Nokia 3310 is heavy and little big handset at 113 x 48 x 22 mm and 133 grams. The black and white display is ideal for text, messages and simple pictures like logos and picture massages.The display resolution 96 x 48 pixel is not very high but is normal for low class phone.

The left side of the unit holds a spacious volume rocker. Lacking LEDs of any kind, however, the display - combined with vibration and audible alerts - is the 3310's only way of notifying users of new messages and missed calls. This is common for all Nokia handsets, requiring users to inconveniently have to pick up and activate the device to see whether any alerts are waiting rather than just glance at it.

The 3310 is comfortable to hold and lies well in ones hand.Sporting a simple and user friendly menu in style with other recent Nokia handsets.The plastic keypad has good placed keys, with the shrunken center keys for no apparent reason, make the phone harder to dial than necessary.Unfortunately, the keypad of the Nokia 3310 emits excess noise, but on the bright side its keys have been comfortably spaced and sized. We're not entirely happy with the design of the navigational pad and its adjacent buttons, however, as distinguishing between these less easy than it ought to be.And last,but not least, a simple two-way navigation buttons centered below the display.

Dual band 900/1800 MHz connectivity isn't all the Nokia 3310 has to offer: there's also support for SMS, .and spacious phone book.

Audio quality on the 3310 was crystal clear, and signal quality was good. The removable 850 mAh Li-ion battery is rated for 4.3 hours talk time or 245 hours standby, which is quite low given the battery's theoretical capacity. Charge time is about 127 minutes. The Nokia 3310 is now available throughout Europe in some language version.

Nokia 3310 is a beautiful phone to hold and use, and it's quickly won our hearts. The typical Nokia design flair is present in abundance, with all the requisite consumer features to back it up.But love doesn't notice such little flaws.

Nokia 9210 (2000)

The Nokia 9210 Communicator is a significant advance toward the mobile information society, combining many key elements of third generation technology such as a high-resolution color display, high speed mobile e-mail, a new user interface, and multimedia capabilities like full color video clips. Additionally, the Nokia 9210 Communicator is the first Nokia product to support the most commonly used PC office applications - such as Microsoft Office - and the first with wireless Java support. And with bigger and better keys and a wide range of add- on software and accessories, the Nokia 9210 Communicator is designed to meet the demanding needs of mobile professionals and corporate users.

The Nokia 9210 was the first version of this phone aimed at the European market. The Nokia 9210i is an updated version, and the Nokia 9290 is a US version of the 9210i. However they can all be treated the same in terms of the way they work. They have the same operating system and tips and tricks applying to one will generally apply to all.

Nokia 5210 (2001)

The classic style of Nokia design in areas of shape, colour and design, weighing in at 92 g and measuring 106 x 48 x 23 mm, the 5210 is petite and relatively lightweight. The black and white display is ideal for text, messages and simple pictures like logos and picture massages.The display resolution 96 x 48 pixel is not very high but is normal for low class phone.

The left side of the unit holds a spacious volume rocker. Lacking LEDs of any kind, however, the display - combined with vibration and audible alerts - is the 5210's only way of notifying users of new messages and missed calls. This is common for all Nokia handsets, requiring users to inconveniently have to pick up and activate the device to see whether any alerts are waiting rather than just glance at it.

Nokia 5210 is a beautiful phone to hold and use, and it's quickly won our hearts. The typical Nokia design flair is present in abundance, with all the requisite consumer features to back it up.But love doesn't notice such little flaws.

Nokia 3650 (2002)

The 3650 has an integrated digital camera with a 640 x 480 resolution, plus the ability to record and play back video images. Video clips are short - no more than 30-40 seconds maximum.

The Nokia 3650's 4096 colour display is reasonably large at 176 x 208 pixels. However, it does not have the quality of more recent phones. The phone can display video using several formats: MPEG-4 inside 3GP, RealAudio and RealVideo inside RealMedia format.

Although the Nokia 3650 may not look much like the Nokia 7650, inside they are quite similar. The 3650 incorporates many of the features that made the older 7650 into the best multimedia phone of its time, and extends its capabilities further. Like the 7650, the Nokia 3650 has a Symbian operating system with a graphical user interface. It also has MMS, Java™, polyphonic ringtones and Bluetooth™ connectivity. What the Nokia 3650 brings in addition is reduced weight (one of the main problems with the 7650 was its sheer heaviness), plus new features like video capture, triband, full Bluetooth™ support, a ringtone composer, and lots of improvements to the overall user-friendliness of the phone. Perhaps the one feature that will cause problems is the idiosyncratic circular keypad design.

The Java capability means that you can download games just as easily as downloading ringtones or graphics. As well as Java and Symbian games, you can also download applications like personal assistants, travel and information tools. MMS means that you can send and receive multimedia messages containing text, audio, graphics and video.

It has to be said that this was a state-of-the-art phone when released! The Nokia 3650 is simply crammed full of multimedia and connectivity capabilities, yet it retains a nice user-friendly graphical user interface. The 3650 has now been replaced by the Nokia 3660, which is very similar but with some significant improvements. The main problems with the 3650 are the poor quality screen, unergonomic keypad and unreliability.

Nokia 5100 (2002)

The Nokia 5100 is probably one of the oddest phones we have seen. The design is definitely over the top and the inclusion of programs such as a calorie burner and sound meter have us wondering if the cell phone market has become so competitive to the point that every little add-on function is necessary to stay one step ahead of the competition. The power button on the 5100 is ridiculously hard to push and for every extra ability the 5100 has, there still is no Bluetooth capability. The 5100 proved to be very rugged and durable in our tests due to the rubber casing and we got accustomed to the thick rubber keys. Beyond the 5100’s hard exterior is a charming and intelligent phone with a bright display and plenty of features. The 5100 is the perfect phone for those with an active lifestyle. Teens will no doubt also fall in love with the 5100’s total customizability.

Nokia 6800 (2002)

When you turn the phone horizontally and open it up, you'll be presented with a full keyboard. You can even start writing a message with the cover closed, and continue with the cover open.

With its efficient and unique design, the Nokia 6800 lets you write more easily and effectively. The concatenated messaging function lets you write much longer messages, and the distribution list function will allow you to send a message to several people at a time. With multimedia messaging (MMS), you can receive messages containing a mixture of text, polyphonic sound, and an image, which can be saved as a ringtone or as wallpaper; you can also send and forward messages containing images and text to other MMS compatible phones.

Polyphonic ringtones and an integrated stereo FM radio offer you a high-quality sound experience. SyncML compatibility allows you to synchronize personal data remotely over a network. With the Notes feature, it's easy to take short meeting minutes, capture your thoughts, or keep a diary. We definitely recommend that you consider the 6820 instead however, as the 6800 feels very much like a prototype for this device.

Nokia N-gage (2002)

Nokia N-Gage is mobile phone developed by Nokia, intended for gamers who like to have the all in one solutions and are tired to wear at once two gadgets in them - mobile phone for talking and handheld console for gaming. Being a great mobile phone manufacturer, Nokia decided to try at this unexplored by them territory and directly compete with the well known established player - Nintendo, which GameBoy consoles were selling very good but lacked that cool phone ability. Released in 2003 it had good specifications for pocket device but weak marketing, combined with the competition from Nintendo and the poor design, made the phone one of the worst selling Nokia products ever.

Nokia 3300 (2003)

The Nokia 3300 (offered by Cingular Wireless), a cell phone and MP3 player, comes with a full keyboard and a fairly large color display. It supports MMC media to store MP3s. The phone comes with a headset, but you can play music through the speakerphone, which has mediocre sound quality. You can create playlists on your PC using the bundled Nokia Audio Manager software, and transfer them to the phone via USB cable or memory card. The Nokia 3300 is a good MP3 player, but as a phone, it's a bit hard to dial.

The Nokia 3300 is the first GSM mobile phone supporting True Tones, which provide ring tones with real music, allowing users to have songs, nature sounds, special effects and engine sounds to alert them of an incoming call. This is Nokia´s continued effort to enable consumers to personalise their phones with ring tones in a new and innovative sound format. True Tones will be part of Nokia´s wide range of mobile services for music when the Nokia 3300 phone is commercially available. They are based on the Adaptive Multi-Rate Wideband (AMR-WB) technology that has been selected by Third Generation Partnership Project (3GPP) as the Wideband codec for GSM and 3rd generation wireless WCDMA applications.

Nokia 6108 (2003)

The elegant Nokia 6108 is equipped with a touch pad and stylus for intuitive handwriting recognition in English and Chinese. So you can take notes, send messages and emails easily. This stylishly compact and feature-rich Nokia 6108 has tri-band (GSM 900/1800/1900) functionality, a high resolution colour display, MMS, Java, a built-in email client, an XHTML browser, a "Chinese-English-Chinese" dictionary and enhanced features for Chinese language users in the Asia Pacific.

Heavily influenced by classic Nokia design in areas of shape, colour and design, weighing in at 98 g and measuring 106 x 46 x 26 mm, the 6108 is petite and relatively lightweight. The 4096-color display is dim, not very bright and crisp, but is a far step above the very dim 256-color versions on even the most recent Nokia models.The display resolution 128 x 128 pixel which is standart resolution for more mobile phones.

The left side of the unit holds a spacious volume rocker. Lacking LEDs of any kind, however, the display - combined with vibration and audible alerts - is the 6108's only way of notifying users of new messages and missed calls. This is common for all Nokia handsets, requiring users to inconveniently have to pick up and activate the device to see whether any alerts are waiting rather than just glance at it.

Nokia 7600 (2003)

Nokia once again proves its successful marketing strategy. It’s simple; release the phones, when they should be released- right now, not in the future. Even by releasing the UMTS phone 6650, Nokia kept to their strategy, you can buy this phone in countries that don’t even have UMTS-networks. A lot of users choose these types of models because it’s a sign of prestige, mostly due to the price and amount of the released handsets. On the other hand, Nokia 6650’s design and size resulted in poor sales. This is why the 7600 was introduced. As you’ve already guessed, it’s the same 6650, but in a different casing. It’s not a smartphone.

The phone looks unusual; almost square, shaped a little like a water drop. The sides are made a bit oval, which results in great ergonomics and it fits in your hand nicely. At first it becomes rather unaccustomed to talk on the phone. Even though, after using Nokia’s N-Gage this seemed alright. The size 87õ78õ18.6 mm is not typical for UMTS-phones, although its capacity remained the same (103 cbcm), this was made possible due to a new casing. The phone’s weight is typical as well, 123 grams. The 7600 is a little lighter than the 6650, but the battery also has a smaller capacity. The phone comes in two colours: yellow and grey.

Nokia 3230 (2004)

Nokia 3230 is just another smartphone in series of these devices from Nokia. Its main advantages include large display, high quality of taken photos and quite comfortable user's interface. Main disadvantage is quite uncomfortable keyboard, long delay when taking photos and poor range of accessories that comes with the handset (no data-cable and CD with PC software). But despite these disadvantages, Nokia 3230 is quite good device and will surely find its buyers, especially among young users.

Nokia 3230 weighs 110 grams and has a size of 109x49x19 so it is quite comfortable to use. The quality of signal was strong enough almost everywhere. In locations, where signal strength is low, 3230 was working better than several handsets from rival manufacturers. Phone is tri-band and works in GSM 900/1800/1900 networks.

Phone comes with a battery, a charger, 32 MB rsMMC card, a headset and a manual. Unfortunately, there is no data-cable and CD with PC software. Of course, you can download the necessary software and connect phone with a PC via IrDA or Bluetooth, but not all PCs have these connections.

Nokia 6620 (2004)

The Nokia 6620 camera phone is the first handset for AT&T's EDGE network—a high-speed data network promising more than double the speed of dialup Internet connections or GPRS wireless links for data transfers. The phone is big, bright, and fun, and the EDGE compatibility gives it a leg up over other handsets. Just don't mistake it for a mobile office.

The EDGE network, available in most major markets nationwide, enables you to do more with the 6620. For starters, you can browse the Web, download apps to the phone at a faster rate, watch streaming video clips of baseball and basketball games, and download other clips from the Web to watch on the built-in RealPlayer. Even better, you can use your phone as a wireless modem for your laptop, getting up to 118.4 kilobits per second throughput (in our tests, we got up to 80Kbps in midtown Manhattan). You can either hook the phone up wirelessly using Bluetooth—an awkward but learnable process—or buy an optional USB cable. This means you can surf wirelessly anywhere there's a signal.

Like the 6600, it's a bar-style phone with a bulge in the middle, a VGA camera on the back (without flash), big buttons, and a bright 2.1-inch, 176-by-220 screen. It's big, but not too clunky. Photos from the 0.5-megapixel camera look great on the screen, and the night mode works well in low light. The 6620 can record video clips (up to 10 minutes); the quality is poor, but on par with other video-phones. Surprisingly, you can edit these on the phone, pretty easily, with a Ulead-branded editing application.

Nokia 7280 (2004)

Nokia 7280 is the king among all stylish phones. The little oblong black brick provokes a mixture between astonishment and curiosity never mind the fact that handling its functions is confusing. Its equipment does not fall behind though either: feel free to enjoy a huge address book, 50MB of memory, MP3 ringtones, a camera, a radio, Bluetooth.

Nokia apparently decided, however, to offer its customers originality and elegance combined with maximum functionality. That is how three exceptional models: 7260, 7270 and 7280 were brought to life. The first one is a mobile phone constructed in a classic way, but dressed in an extravagant coat with underlined marginal. It is the cheapest of the group but nevertheless disposing of very sophisticated equipment. Speaking of qualities, the clamshell 7270 has even more to show off. With it the manufacturers have dared experiment more. The outer covers are made of metal additionally protected by leather covering. The inner part of the phone has also been planned untraditionally - it is black with colorful lines. The 7280 model is the top of the ice-cream within the mentioned class of phones in the sense of both functions and design.

Nokia 6260 (2004)

One of the characteristics of te 6260's clamshell design is the rotating screen which can be rotated to a number of positions - open, closed, facing inwards and facing outwards. The display face can be closed with the screen facing outwards for browsing the internet or using applications.

The screen is very high quality - one of thebest from Nokia - using active TFT technology for a sharp bright image, with 65k colours and a high resolution. A good quality screen like this is essential for making good use of the various business applications that come with the phone.

The 6260 is a series 60 phone with a Symbian operatig system. Foremost amongst the pre-installed business applications is a mobile email client that uses Quickword and Quickpoint viewers for viewing attachments (Word and PowerPoint documents). Additional Java™ and Symbian applications can be stored, and a pre-loaded memory card is supplied with a number of "try-and-buy" applications.

Nokia 1100 (2005)

The Nokia 1100 (and closely related variants, the Nokia 1101 and the Nokia 1108) is a basic GSM mobile phone produced by Nokia. 250 million 1100s have been sold since its launch in late 2003, making it the world's best selling phone handset and the best selling consumer electronics device in the world. The model has been discontinued.

The 1100 achieved its popularity despite being made during a time when more modern cellphones with more features (e.g. colour screen, internal camera) were available in the market. It was targeted towards developing countries and users who do not require advanced features beyond making calls and SMS text messages, alarm clock, reminders, etc.

Nokia 3250 XpressMusic (2005)

Nobody can accuse Nokia of a lack of innovation. Their Nokia 3250 music phone incorporates a twisting, almost Rubix Cube-like design which houses the regular phone keypad on one side, a camera in the middle and music controls on the rear. It is a unique and functional design that will appeal to those wanting something a little different. The music and camera applications are quite well implemented; however as a phone this unit has several problems, ranging from poor controls through to sluggish operation and a menu structure that only previous Nokia users will likely appreciate.

The key feature of this model is its music player. The rotating keypad flips one way to activate the camera and the other to reveal play/pause, stop and track skip buttons, and automatically fire up the music application. While it is a cool and quite unique way of integrating MP3 functionality, we can't help but think it is a little clunky. In the end it is easier to simply hit a button that activates the music software and have the media keys on the face or sides, such as Sony Ericsson's set up on their Walkman line of phones.

Nokia 6280 (2005)

This solid, sturdy slider is certainly a heavy-duty mobile, both in terms of functionality and sheer physical weight, and with 3G capabilities, a wide range of connectivity options, good internet tools, capable media player and a 2-megapixel camera, is as close as you’ll get to a smartphone without stepping up to the N-series.
The first thing you’ll notice on the Nokia 6280 is its large screen. Its 240x320 resolution is the same as the similarly specified Nokia 6233, but at 35x45mm is one of the biggest screens available in the sub-smartphone category, and shows off the 262,000 colours to great effect.

Beneath the screen are the navigation and main selection buttons, used to access the phone’s main functions and user-set shortcuts. These are solid and offer a reassuring click in response. The four-way navigation key is a single silver square, set around the central selection key, and stands proud of the five other keys so there’s no danger of pressing a selection key by mistake.

The front fascia slides up with a positive click to reveal the keypad. The keys are small without being difficult to press, and a metal bar between the three columns means you’re unlikely to press the wrong key. The top row's 1-2-3 keys are a little close to the bottom of the slider, but this is a minor complaint.

Nokia E61/E61i (2005)

The most notable absentee in the features list – tea making facilities aside – is a camera. The E61 is one in a series of handsets, the, er, E series, and they are primarily aimed at the business community. Missing out cameras makes those companies afraid of people taking sneaky photos of their secret plans (or whatever) happier.

The fact that you can’t make video calls or take snaps of something it would be useful to show to a colleague, is obviously less important here and if those things matter to you, look elsewhere for a handset. This isn’t to say that ordinary consumers might not be interested in the E61 too, though. It’s main task –delivering email to you while on the move – can be achieved either thanks to enterprise networks which whang out to you via their servers, or thanks to a quick poll of your ordinary old POP3 personal email.

The E61 has Wi-Fi built in, so if you are in the vicinity of a network you can use for free you don’t even have to pay connection charges for email retrieval. Bluetooth is here too, and so is infra red, which means you have the full monty of wireless communications options. Having mentioned the Web browser, this seems a good time to look at it in more detail. The E61 runs Symbian Series 60 3rd Edition, and this has a different browser to that which appears in Series 60 2nd edition.

The E61 has a wide format screen, so that its 320 pixels are along the horizontal, its 240 pixels on the vertical. The wide format would be great for reading Web pages rendered to the full width of the screen, but the browser doesn’t do that, so you have to pan horizontally to read most sites.

Nokia N70 (2005)

N70's design is very attractive. This is not only my opinion. People discussing phones think the same. The reason is that Nokia N70 has finally been given an outlook, which deserves to represent equipment for 500 euros. It is made of plastic, but you won't tell at all. Nokia N70 gives a luxurious metal impression. The plastic material, of which the inner body of the phone is made, is solid and pleasant to touch. I am testing the silver-black version. It is also offered in a combination of white and wine red, but I don't think it looks that good.

What is really interesting is the construction of Nokia N70: its dark inner part is covered in silver. The smaller back cover is a slider. In its basic position it meets the bevelled upper part of the front silver cover. When you remove the cover, the camera lens pops out. The cover itself levels with the bottom edge of the front cover.

The construction of the removable back cover is better than the one in the 6681 model, where Nokia first presented this construction type. It does not creak. It shows a bit of a play as its plastic shell bends down, but it is not critical. A notable hunch can be seen on the back cover when the phone is looked at from aside. It is what makes the phone thicker.

Phone's front side is eye catching thanks to a plate with metal outlook. It is made of plastic and catches fingerprints even though it is not entirely glossy. Fingerprints reign on the display too. Nokia seems to be fully aware of this disadvantage, because they have prepared a special cloth to go with the phone.

In the upper left corner of the phone there is a sensor, which regulates the backlighting of the display and the keypad. I really wish Nokia had added a switch-off option for the backlighting, but my expectations were in vain. I just don't find it practical that the keypad beams in a rather disordered manner. On top of it, in the user manual, Nokia states that the display and the keypad may sometimes blink as a side effect. To me though, if nothing else, a possible switch-off function would have saved energy.

Nokia N92 (2005)

Nokia N92, the world's first integrated DVB-H mobile device in the Nokia Nseries range for watching broadcast TV programs. The Nokia N92 offers easy access to TV programs without having to sit in front of a television set. Users can set reminders to watch their favourite TV programs, create personal channel lists and subscribe to TV channel packages.

The outstanding new form factor offers a highly ergonomic user-experience. The usability is further enhanced by the large 2.8" anti-glare QVGA screen with 16 million colours and the dedicated media keys that deliver a rich viewing experience.

The Nokia N92 has four different modes for simple and easy usage. The new view mode is especially designed for watching TV and video. To start watching mobile TV, users simply need to open the Nokia N92 in view mode and press the Multimedia key. The Electronic Service Guide (ESG) contains information about the available TV channels, programs and services. Other mobile TV features include watching time of up to four hours, recording and 30 seconds replay.

Nokia 770 (2005)

The Nokia 770 Internet Tablet is a new breed of device, aimed at putting the Internet and an excellent web browsing experience in the palm of your hand. Larger than a PDA (but not by much) and sharing the same touch screen experience, the Nokia 770 doesn't aim to replace the PDA nor your mobile phone. In fact the device has no mobile phone radio, a first for a Nokia device. Instead it relies on its WiFi 802.11g connectivity or you may use a Bluetooth-enabled phone as a wireless modem for the Nokia when you're not in range of a WiFi network. The concept is in some ways similar to Bill Gates' failed venture into the web pad business: a device that's intended to access the web anywhere in your wireless-enabled home or business but lacks the power of a full-blown computer. Nokia has smartly evaded the web pad's shortcomings: a high price, Windows' high maintenance requirements and large size (bigger and heavier than a medium format book). The 770 is compact and reasonably priced at a suggested list price of $359.99. Since demand for the device is higher than supply, you may find it for sale at higher than suggested list price.

Rather than saying what the Nokia 770 is not, let's start with what it is: an extremely compact handheld device designed for Internet addicts and everyday folks who wish to access the web instantly and easily from places other than their desk in front of a PC. It has a bright and sharp 800 x 480 pixel four inch display reminiscent of the Samsung Nexio S160. The device measures 5.5" wide by 3" high by .75" thick with its metal slip cover on. It weighs 8.1 ounces, is pretty easy on the hands, and the included easel stand, similar to that included with the short-lived Nokia 7710 smartphone means you can sit it on the table if you prefer. The device has WiFi 802.11b/g and Bluetooth 1.2 (you can use your Bluetooth enabled-phone as a modem for the Nokia 770 when WiFi isn't available). The unit has a touch screen like a PDA and two styli are included. The device is geared toward those who don't want to sit with a laptop on the couch or wait for a PC to boot up just to quickly check something online. It's geared to those who want to listen to streaming radio anywhere a WiFi or Bluetooth connection is available. It's geared to those who live for RSS news feeds and email.

Nokia 5300 (2006)

Brings a fun and affordable slant to the music mobile market, tempered slightly by the poor phone and low internal memory.

Nokia has set out its stall for high end music mobiles with its N91 4GB and 8GB mobiles, but it's also keen to scoop up some of the budget end of the market too. The Nokia 5300 XpressMusic is a handset clearly targeted at a young music-loving audience, with its bold colour scheme and slider chic. It's immediately apparent that the 5300 is part of an ever-growing army of dedicated music mobiles from the array of rubberised transport controls lined up along the handset's coloured rim.

In the case of our review model, this was red and white, but for the more reserved it's also available in black and white. The frame around the largish 2-inch, 262k-colour display is a muted silver, which is carried over to the hidden keypad.

It's not the thinnest sliderphone around, although it is relatively compact in the palm of your hand. The slide-action top springs open effortlessly with a reassuring 'clunk', and despite the phone's solid feel it's in no way cumbersome. This quality extends to the keypad and navigational buttons, too, which all make good use of the extra space available to present surprisingly tactile controls. The usual Nokia layout is followed, and the crystal-clear QVGA screen is another plus.

Getting down to the nitty-gritty, the 5300 is first and foremost a music mobile, and targets most of its efforts in this area. So how does it fare? Close observers will notice straight away the updated Series 40 Music Player, which brings the handset more in line with the offerings of music mobile maestro, Sony Ericsson.

Nokia E65 (2006)

The E65 comes in two colour schemes. Mine was brown – Nokia calls it Mocca – and silver. The alternative is red and silver. The brown parts are made of a rubbery substance which makes the E65 easy to grip. I don’t like the leather-look stipple on the back, but that is just a matter of personal taste.

This is a slider handset. I feel sliders should be very small when closed, and at 105mm tall and 49mm wide, the E65 is not that much smaller than a standard candybar phone. At 15.5mm it’s not that thin either, though its 115g of weight is acceptable.

The slider mechanism feels solid, is slightly spring-loaded and delivers a comforting click when fully extended or closed, but Nokia has not thought hard enough about the ergonomics of using it. There is no thumbgrip for sliding the phone open, which means that you are forced either to put a thumb mark on the screen or press the edge of the large central select button of the navigation pad. Neither is a perfect solution.

The E65 is a quad-band 3G handset and like others in the E range is unashamedly aimed primarily at business users though of course there's nothing to stop others going for it too. Be aware if you are interested, that there is no front facing camera for video calling.

The front fascia houses ten keys and the navigation pad. I'm not so sure even business people are going to find a great deal of use for the conference call key, though it can be set to call a default number for conference calls should you need it.

Nokia N81 (2007)

The Nokia N81 may be marketed as a music focused mobile; the retail box is plastered with pictures of rowdy concerts, and the user manual is covered with musicians in recording studios, but there's nothing about the device itself that screams "Rock!". The piano black and brushed titanium body is classy looking, but not particularly sexy. At 18mm in thickness the N81 is a stocky-looking slider phone that feels similar to others in the Nokia family, the N95, the E65 and the 6110 Navigator to name a few, but without the advanced components in those devices we think the N81 should have at least been slimmer.

External navigation keys show the direction Nokia has taken with the N81, with music player controls front and centre, the call buttons pushed way out to the side, and the volume controls on the side are large and easy to find without looking. A keypad lock switch on the top is a smart addition, used to unlock the external keypad without having to slide the phone open.

Audio is heard through an external speaker on the side of N81, or alternatively -- and preferably -- through headphones plugged into the 3.5mm headphone jack on the top. The ability to use your favourite headphones, via the 3.5mm port, is a winner on a media device, and having it on top means you can keep the phone in your pocket comfortably while listening to your tunes.

Nokia E90 Communicator (2007)

The Nokia E90 looks like a giant phone from the 80s when it's shut, but open it up and it transforms into what looks like a mini laptop. It's definitely not pocket-friendly in any way, but is one of the most stylish Nokia devices in its class and has a solid feel and quality finish.

As with all the previous Communicator handsets, the E90 boasts a large internal colour screen and full Qwerty keypad. The latter lets you tap out long emails and read them in relative comfort, thanks to its long, wide design.
The keys on the keypad provide a good amount of tactile feedback although we did find the space bar a little stiff. The internal display is sharp and great for using to view emails, photos and Web pages.

Of course, you wouldn't want to make phone calls on the E90 when it's open, which is why there's an external screen and keypad. Both are well laid-out and convenient to use for calling and writing quick text messages. Unlike previous Communicator external displays, the E90's gives you access to every feature available on the phone. This is very useful and less fiddly than having to open the phone up.

Holding the internal and external sections together are two chunky metal hinges that prop the screen up at varying angles. These allow you to view the large internal screen on your desk or hold it up completely flat, which is good when writing emails.

This is one of the most feature-packed smart phones Nokia has produced so far and, unlike previous 9000 Series handsets, runs on the S60 platform. You can keep in touch practically anywhere you go via infrared, Bluetooth, quad-band GSM, HSDPA (3.5G) and Wi-Fi. As with Nokia's consumer-based smart phone, the Nokia N95 , the E90 comes with built-in GPS and Nokia maps. It serves its purpose when looking for an address on foot, but we found it a little slow to pick up a GPS signal and you need to pay to get step-by-step and voice navigation.

Browsing the Web was also a little less exciting than we expected because certain pages took a while to render properly, but once they did the large screen made them much easier to view than on smaller phones. Accessing all the features you'd need while out on business is made easy using the dedicated keys on top of the Qwerty keypad. The large screen splits certain sections into two halves and lets you view all your message folders, for example, without needing to go in and out of every one.

Nokia 7900 Prism (2007)

It’s all about style and image. While it’s far from unusual to pick a phone for its looks, giving a run-out to a mobile with such a singular style signature as the Nokia 7900 Prism is certainly making one stand-out fashion statement.

All sharp angles and patterns, Nokia’s 7900 Prism design won’t appeal to everyone; it’s definitely one of those phones that divides opinion, in a love-it-or-loathe kind of way.
Its slimline glossy black candybar body reflects the overt Prism theme, with a symmetrical numberpad comprising triangular keys, a diamond-shaped central navigation D-pad, and scored triangle pattern decorating the back panel.
The Prism design cues continue under the skin, with an unusual piece of light manipulation - the 7900’s keypad backlighting can be switched to one of 49 different colours from a palette of onscreen tones. Complementing this, themes for the phone’s display can also be changed to a selection of atmospheric abstract patterns that blend in with the black casing.

Reflecting on the 7900 Prism’s form, the obvious question is whether this is a phone that places style over substance.

Nokia 8600 Luna (2007)

Nokia's premium range has had everyone from city boys to students drooling since the chrome-clad 8810 first hit the shelves five years ago, and its appeal shows no sign of being different with the latest luxury model - the 8600 Luna.

The big question, though, is whether the Nokia 8600 Luna can tackle the style-over-substance argument that's been levelled against some of Nokia's high-end range in the past.

Heading the current luxury line-up, the Nokia 8800 Sirocco represents a step too far financially for most of us - which is where the 8600 Luna comes in. Aimed at aspiring Sirocco owners, the 8600 makes a style statement all of its own with a smoked glass sliding cover and a weightyness that says clearly "I'm expensive".

Despite this, you can actually get your hands on its sleek form for free on some of the higher-usage contracts and online offers, making it a much more agreeable option. On its own however, you can expect to pay around £500 for a SIM-free handset.

Like previous luxury Nokia models, the Luna is largely encased by its stainless steel chassis but has one important difference: the slider is made from semi-opaque smoked glass that leaves the keypad to glow through, rather ethereally. It glides open with a smooth slide-action, and closes with a reassuring click.

Two long loudspeaker grills add to the overall impression of luxury, and little else is allowed to clutter the edges of the handset save for the microUSB port. This is used for the charger, data cable and stereo headset, conveniently ridding the need for extra connections.

Nokia E63 (2008)

The E63 uses a tablet shape, with a front-facing QWERTY keyboard and a 2.4-inch display. Unlike the mostly-metal E71, the E63 is a plastic-covered device. It also has a thicker profile (13mm vs 10mm) and slightly heavier weight (126g), making it more compairable to a BlackBerry Curve or Palm Treo Pro.

Nevertheless, the soft-touch paint of the rear, and wide profile are pleasing in the hand. The E63 brought back memories of the Treo 680 that I used to own as it felt simply “hand-friendly.” Beyond that, the 320-by-240-pixel (QVGA) screen offers great visibility in indoor and outdoor conditions. The refresh rate seems a touch faster than what I’m used to with my Nokia N95.

On the downside, the E63 lacks dedicated buttons for volume and power. The volume settings are configured either via the devices settings or a sound-specific application (such as the music player). The power button is the same as the call-end button.

Despite this, the mono-speaker was good enough for listening to music, ringtones, and podcasts.

Nokia N97 (2008)

The N97 is essentially laid out to be a mini-UMPC, with a slide out screen nestling at a roughly 40 degree angle on top of a full QWERTY keyboard.

Sliding it up and down feels solid and very satisfying; in fact, it's easy to see that a few people will probably end up breaking the N97's screen as they'll simply be idly flipping it up and down all the time. Even still, it feels like it would be a while before you did that with the Nokia N97, such is its build quality.
The chrome rim around the whole handset is a nice (if fingerprint attracting) touch, and the whole thing feels solid and stable in the hand, and the massive internal 32GB memory (which can be supplemented up to 64GB with a microSD card) gave us the feeling we had a powerhouse on our hands.

t's obviously going to be once again compared to the likes of RIM's general BlackBerry range (despite Nokia's extensive E-series competition) thanks to the keyboard, as well as the Apple iPhone 3G and the HTC Magic, just by the fact that it's a high end touchscreen device with a QWERTY input. In fairness, it's probably more iPhone than BlackBerry, as it clearly doesn't have email at the heart, but is more to fulfil the needs of the consumer who likes to message a fair bit as well as multi-task.

Nokia 5800 (2008)

Physically, the clean, all-black 5800 doesn't make much of an impression at all -- and knowing Nokia, that's by design. By all appearances, it's a simple, functional, and to-the-point device without any frills to detract from its lot in life; only the decoratively patterned battery cover belies the theme. Of course, the same could be said of virtually any slate-style handset, yet still, there's something very uniquely... well, "Nokia" about the 5800's industrial design. It's a polarizing effect; personally, we're on the "love" side of that delicate love / hate balance, but we can imagine plenty of potential buyers being underwhelmed at first glance. The 5800's price and XpressMusic designation suggest that it's meant to live in a market segment where fashion and style often play a pretty big role in the decision, and if you're cross-shopping it (perhaps unfairly) with high-end feature phones, iPhones, Storms, and the like, the 5800 probably isn't going to look as design-conscious, well-made, or aspirational as the competition to the casual observer. Again, don't get us wrong, we dig how it came out -- but by the same token, we'd like to see what the E71's design squad could've done. Fortunately, S60 5th Edition (and its Symbian Foundation-controlled successors) are Nokia's future, so there's no question we'll have plenty of opportunities to see this same platform operating on a variety of form factors, designs, and price points. Of course, whether the 5800 was the right first device to launch will likely be debated for years to come.

"Nokia-ness" isn't the only potential problem with the 5800's physical design, though. Raised bezels around displays are passé by any measure, and the big, fat lip on this particular device is about as prominent as they come. Fortunately, it doesn't touch the edge of the visible area of the display on any side, so it's less of a usability concern here and more of a cleanliness one; if you keep the phone stowed in your pocket, you'll likely end up with dust and lint lodged around that edge. That sleek, black slate isn't so sleek or so black anymore, then, is it? A minor concern, yes -- but again, the bezel serves no functional purpose here, and we would've been just fine with seeing it disappear.

Nokia N86 8Mp (2009)

Announced early 009 and released in mid-2009, the Nokia N86 8MP is Nokia's first 8 Megapixel camera phone and ideal for consumers who want to leave their cameras at home. The photos captured look amazingly vibrant on the 2.6 inch OLED screen. As with all Nokia highend Nseries smartphones, the N86 packs an integrated GPS, 802.11g/b WiFi, TV out, and FM transmitter all in a dual slider format.

The Nokia N86 is an evolutionof the latest Nokia designs with it's slated Symbian key and tighter ring D-pad. A marked improvement to the Nseries design is the addition of the nice metal trim around the top half of the phone and classy design. The glossy top half of the phone mean you'll have lots of fingerprint smudges. The N86's top half has a little noticable wobble when closed and opened. The keypad is a design step back to the Sony Ericssons T610 days.

Nokia X6 (2009)

Nokia die-hards will recognise the X6 immediately. Its boxier, slightly slimmer frame may suggest an entirely new handset, but there's no denying the X6 is just the 5800 XpressMusic dressed a little differently and with a much easier name to say. In a way, the X6 is the phone the 5800 XM should have been; its capacitive touchscreen and 16GB of internal storage were two areas where the 5800 could have been easily improved.

The handset itself lacks the overall polish we expect from a Nokia handset. Its matte-finished black plastic feels a bit cheap to us, the battery cover of our review unit rattles slightly against the body of the phone and the flap covering the USB port won't return to laying flush with the top of the phone, regardless of how hard (or how gently) we try to reposition it. These are minor issues to be sure, but they collect to form a less than perfect first impression.

The X6 features all the external controls you'd expect from a smartphone: a volume rocker, dedicated camera key, a touchscreen lock switch, a 3.5mm headphone port and a micro USB input, plus a few extra external holes to fill including a side-loaded SIM slot, a Nokia proprietary charging pin port and a couple of holes to loop a lanyard through at the base, if you're into that sort of thing. The proprietary charging port is the only disappointment in this list. The X6 was obviously designed prior to the agreement by all manufacturers to use micro USB charging as a standard, meaning if you buy an X6 it's likely you won't be able to share your charger with your room-mates or family members.

Nokia 1280 (2010)

Nokia 1280 is entry level basic phone. It is lightweight and compact to carry. . It has dust resistant keypad and scratch resistant cover. This Nokia phone can store upto 500 phone book contacts and 250 SMS. It comes with FM radio, call tracker, speed dial, and multiple phone book options. Li-Ion 1020 mAh battery of Nokia 1280 provides talk time upto 8 hours and standby time upto 528 hours(Almost 22 days). It also features torch. Other similar models from Nokia are Nokia 100 and Nokia 101. Nokia 1280 is best non camera phone for those who are looking basic non camera phone.

Nokia 6700 Slide (2010)

The 6700 Slide has a cousin, the Nokia 6700 Classic which appeared in the latter half of last year. As the name suggests, that handset was a candybar design, but it shared the same aim of delivering a solid range of features at an attractive price. Nothing too fancy, nothing too expensive. So, what you don't get here are the likes of Wi-Fi, a high resolution screen suitable for lots of multimedia playback, touchscreen capability or oodles of internal memory.

Instead the Nokia 6700 Slide is small. It measures 95.2 x 46.1 x 15.9mm and it weighs 110g. With the slide opened, we measured it at 122mm tall. The screen is small by today's standards at just 2.2-inches. Some would describe the resolution as pitiful at 320 x 240 pixels. Really, when we've just seen RIM's BlackBerry Pearl 3G pack a 2.2-inch 360 x 400 pixel display, it does seem rather paltry. But in everyday use it isn't actually as bad as it sounds. Honest.

Internal memory tops out at 60MB, but you get a 2GB microSD card to boost that, and the handset supports up to 16GB cards, so you can give it a huge memory boost if you feel the urge. One point of note here: the microSD card does not pop out of its slot as readily as many do. The spring loading is not all that well sprung. We found we needed a fingernail to prise the card out of its slot. Still, many of the specs make this handset look pretty good value for its sub-£200 price. It runs Symbian S60 3rd Edition with Feature Pack 2. Old Faithful if you're a previous Nokia fan. Or have ever seen one. It has HSDPA with download speeds up to 10.2Mbps and uploads to 2Mbps.
You'll be extremely hard pushed to find the Nokia 6700 Slide in a situation where its data capabilities can't match what the network can offer.

There is a 5MP camera with Carl Zeiss optics and a dual-LED flash. This is accompanied by a front VGA (640 x 480 pixel) camera for two-way video calling, so the iPhone 4 isn't the only new handset with video calling.

Nokia N8 (2010)

The N8 is a classic-shaped phone with a touchscreen filling most of its facia. It's about the same height and width as the iPhone 4, but a lot thicker. Not surprisingly, it manages to fit a screen that's exactly the same size as the iPhone, at 3.5 inches diagonally. The phone feels very solid in the hand, with an aluminium body and anodised scratch-proof paint. Interestingly, the battery is non-removable, as the metal body completely encloses it. The SIM and memory cards fit into covered slots in the side of the phone.

So, we switch it on and the first thing we notice is the screen. It's AMOLED, so it's nice and bright but we can't help noticing that the resolution doesn't come close to the resolution of the iPhone 4 or the HTC Desire. Don't mistake us: it's not awful, but for a flagship phone it could be better. The next thing we notice is the home screen. It's different to what we've seen before on a Nokia, and that's because the N8 is running Symbian^3. Symbian^3 actually has three home screens, and you can swipe between them with your finger. We notice that the capacitive touchscreen is nice and responsive and that the phone responds quickly to our touch, in contrast to the sluggishness of previous Symbian phones. The display flicks sharply between landscape and portrait modes too. It helps that the N8 has a new, faster processor too. But mutli-tasking can still slow the device to a crawl. Generally speaking, Symbian^3 feels like an evolution, rather than a revolution, which is either a good thing or a bad thing, depending on your point of view. It means that existing Symbian users will adapt to it very easily indeed, but it doesn't offer the great leap forward that some may have hoped for. If you've already made the switch to the iPhone or to Android, you'll probably find that Symbian^3 feels like a backward step.

Nokia E7-00 (2011)

The Nokia E7 takes a number of style cues from the Nokia N8, which isn't a bad thing in our view since we loved the N8's hardware. The E7 is made of the same high-quality materials--aluminum body and glass AMOLED display--giving it a very premium feel. It's slightly bigger and heavier than the N8 at 4.87 inches tall by 2.46 inches wide by 0.54 thick and 6.2 ounces, but considering that the E7 also manages to fit in a full QWERTY keyboard, it's actually pretty amazing that it's only 0.03 inch thicker and 0.1 inch longer than the N8.

The E7's glass touch screen measures 4 inches diagonally and has a 640x360-pixel resolution. In general, it's clear and bright and you'll have no problem reading what's on the screen. However, with a lower-resolution screen, you're not going to get the same sharpness or definition as on today's qHD, Super AMOLED, and retina displays. The pixels are more visible on the E7, so images and text don't look quite as smooth.

On the bright side, the touch screen is very responsive. Launching apps only required a single tap, and we were able to navigate through the various screens and menus with no problem. There are three home screens in total, which you can customize with various widgets and shortcuts, and the main menu of apps is presented in a simple grid format.
Of course, as we've stated before in our reviews of the N8 and the Nokia Astound, Symbian 3 brings a one-touch user interface that makes it much easier to navigate these phones than previous versions of the operating system. However, it still feels clunky in some parts compared with platforms like iOS, Android, and Windows Phone, so Symbian certainly isn't leapfrogging the competition.

Nokia N9 (2011)

he Nokia N9 is the first MeeGo-powered smartphone from the Finns, and we certainly hope it won't be the last because it's actually a rather decent piece of kit. The unibody polycarbonate chassis might feel a little plasticky to the touch, but it seamlessly integrates into the glass 3.9-inch OLED panel, which offers ClearBlack display technology to make the dark bits darker and the colours more vivid than ever before.

Like the Sony Ericsson Xperia Arc, the Nokia N9 design team has worked to improve the quality of the screen by bringing it closer to the glass, making it look darker than ever when the screen is turned off. The chassis of the phone is pretty much free from buttons, save for the volume and power keys on the right hand side. There's no physical home button, with Nokia preferring to use an innovative swipe gesture to navigate around.

With no microSD card slot on offer (Nokia says the N9 will come in 16GB and 64Gb variants) the only ports live on the top of the phone, with the headphone jack, a pop-up cover to the microUSB connector and a pop-up tray for the microSIM.

Nokia 808 PureView (2012)

There's nothing spectacular about the front of the Nokia 808. The display takes the bulk of the space on the front, with the earpiece grill and the front-camera just above the Nokia branding on the top.Just below the screen are three buttons, with no physical separation, such that they appear as one long button instead. The left-most button is (Green) Call/ Answer, the middle-button is Menu, while the right-most is the (Red) Power/ End Call button.
The back of the Nokia 808 PureView has the 41-megapixel sensor with Carl Zeiss optics, a Xenon flash and the loudspeaker, in a casing that rises well above the back.

The left side of the Nokia 808 is completely bare, while the right side features the volume rocker, the slider that can be used to lock/ unlock the phone and the dedicated camera key. The curved corners lead to the mini-HDMI, Micro-USB, mic and 3.5mm jack on the top, and the second microphone plus a lanyard/ wrist strap hole at the bottom.
The curves on the 808 are much needed, as they make the task of holding what is a rather bulky phone, a little bit easier. But the curves can only do so much, and the Nokia 808 feels like a relic from another era. Throw in an external antenna, and the 808 will be right at home in the 1990s.

The weight of the phone does nothing to change that impression. The phone looks and feels heavy, and wherever we went, the weight (169 grams) was almost always the first thing people talked about. The phone measures 17.95mm thick at the camera - that's the closest a phone has coming to touch the 2-centimetre mark in recent times. We're not sure that's the crown Nokia should be gunning for. That's the price you pay for carrying 41 megapixels in your pocket. But even at its thinnest, the Nokia 808 is 13.95mm.

Nokia Lumia 1020 (2013)

Nokia has a knack of producing memorable-looking hardware, and the Lumia 1020 is no exception with its yellow colouring and unapologetically bulky frame. It’s bold and in your face and it certainly has a lot of character but it certainly won’t be to everyone’s tastes.

Exact measurements are 130x71x10mm and the Lumia 1020 weighs in at 158g, making it 10g lighter than the Samsung Galaxy Note 3 but substantially heavier than Apple’s 112g iPhone 5S. It does feel chunky in the hand and it won’t sit flush to a surface on account of the 3mm bulge at the top of the back panel where the PureView lens resides.

The 1020’s added bulk is a trade-off, yes, but I wouldn’t consider it a deal breaker. The handset itself feels sturdy enough in the hand and is perfectly suited for one-handed use. It is a lot bigger than the iPhone 5S and the HTC One Mini and despite Nokia’s careful design and grippy polycarbonate build material the Lumia 1020 does feel slightly top-heavy in the hand.

With hardware keys you have a volume rocker, power/unlock, and physical camera shutter button running down the right hand side. The SIM tray and 3.5mm jack are located on the very top of the handset, and there’s a microUSB port on the bottom.

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English

John
John
Merelinc
24.07.1987
male
Frontend developer

http://merelinc.com/images/035-nokia-phones-history/nokia-phones.jpg
Nokia phones story: from brick to hi-end
http://merelinc.com/images/035-nokia-phones-history/nokia-phones.jpg
I think everybody has had more than one Nokia phone. It is like nostalgia: N-Gage QD, 1101, 3230, 7280... Today everybody has a multifunctional device, but we still can remember a time, when Nokia phones were real hi-end or stylish devices. Legendary company has a lot of legendary cheap and expensive phones. So, let's see on some of them. If you won't find your past Nokia phone in the list - write me a short e-mail and you will see missed device soon.
I think everybody has had more than one Nokia phone. It is like nostalgia: N-Gage QD, 1101, 3230, 7280... Today everybody has a multifunctional device, but we still can remember a time, when Nokia phones were real hi-end or stylish devices. Legendary company has a lot of legendary cheap and expensive phones. So, let's see on some of them. If you won't find your past Nokia phone in the list - write me a short e-mail and you will see missed device soon.
article
History of Nokia phones design

Nokia phones story: from brick to hi-end

I think everybody has had more than one Nokia phone. It is like nostalgia: N-Gage QD, 1101, 3230, 7280... Today everybody has a multifunctional device, but we still can remember a time, when Nokia phones were real hi-end or stylish devices. Legendary company has a lot of legendary cheap and expensive phones. So, let's see on some of them. If you won't find your past Nokia phone in the list - write me a short e-mail and you will see missed device soon.

1900

John
John
Merelinc
24.07.1987
male
Frontend developer

2015

John
John
Merelinc
24.07.1987
male
Frontend developer

05-01-2015

John
John
Merelinc
24.07.1987
male
Frontend developer

Nokia phones story: from brick to hi-end

I think everybody has had more than one Nokia phone. It is like nostalgia: N-Gage QD, 1101, 3230, 7280... Today everybody has a multifunctional device, but we still can remember a time, when Nokia phones were real hi-end or stylish devices. Legendary company has a lot of legendary cheap and expensive phones. So, let's see on some of them. If you won't find your past Nokia phone in the list - write me a short e-mail and you will see missed device soon.

Nokia phones story: from brick to hi-end

I think everybody has had more than one Nokia phone. It is like nostalgia: N-Gage QD, 1101, 3230, 7280... Today everybody has a multifunctional device, but we still can remember a time, when Nokia phones were real hi-end or stylish devices. Legendary company has a lot of legendary cheap and expensive phones. So, let's see on some of them. If you won't find your past Nokia phone in the list - write me a short e-mail and you will see missed device soon.

John
John
Merelinc
24.07.1987
male
Frontend developer
John
John
Merelinc
24.07.1987
male
Frontend developer

English
2320
History of Nokia phones design
2015



article
History of Nokia phones design
true
nokia,nokia phones history,nokia phones,phone history,history,Nokia Mobira Talkman 450,Nokia Mobira Cityman 900,Nokia 1011,Nokia 232,Nokia 8110,Nokia 9000 Communicator,Nokia 3110,Nokia 5110,Nokia 3210,Nokia 8850,Nokia 3310,Nokia 9210,Nokia 5210,Nokia 3650,Nokia 5100,Nokia 6800,Nokia N-gage,Nokia 3300,Nokia 6108,Nokia 7600,Nokia 3230,Nokia 6620,Nokia 7280,Nokia 6260,Nokia 1100,Nokia 3250 XpressMusic,Nokia 6280,Nokia E61/E61i,Nokia N70,Nokia N92,Nokia 770,Nokia 5300,Nokia E65,Nokia N81,Nokia E90 Communicator,Nokia 7900 Prism,Nokia 8600 Luna,Nokia E63,Nokia N97,Nokia 5800,Nokia N86 8Mp,Nokia X6,Nokia 1280,Nokia 6700 Slide,Nokia N8,Nokia E7-00,Nokia N9,Nokia 808 PureView,Nokia Lumia 1020

I think everybody has had more than one Nokia phone. It is like nostalgia: N-Gage QD, 1101, 3230, 7280... Today everybody has a multifunctional device, but we still can remember a time, when Nokia phones were real hi-end or stylish devices. Legendary company has a lot of legendary cheap and expensive phones. So, let's see on some of them. If you won't find your past Nokia phone in the list - write me a short e-mail and you will see missed device soon.

Nokia phones story: from brick to hi-end